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The central region of spiral galaxies as seen by Herschel : M81, M99 and M100

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Abstract
With appropriate spatial resolution, images of spiral galaxies in thermal infrared (similar to 10 mu m and beyond) often reveal a bright central component, distinct from the stellar bulge, superimposed on a disk with prominent spiral arms. ISO and Spitzer studies have shown that much of the scatter in the mid-infrared colors of spiral galaxies is related to changes in the relative importance of these two components, rather than to other modifications, such as the morphological type or star formation rate, that affect the properties of the galaxy as a whole. With the Herschel imaging capability from 70 to 500 mu m, we revisit this two-component approach at longer wavelengths, to see if it still provides a working description of the brightness distribution of galaxies, and to determine its implications on the interpretation of global far-infrared properties of galaxies. We quantify the luminosity of the central component by both a decomposition of the radial surface brightness profile and a direct extraction in 2D. We find the central component contribution is variable within the three galaxies in our sample, possibly connected more directly to the presence of a bar than to the morphological type. The central component's relative contribution is at its maximum in the mid-infrared range and drops around 160 mu m to reach a constant value beyond 200 mu m. The central component contains a greater fraction of hot dust than the disk component, and while the colors of the central components are scattered, colors of the disk components are more homogenous from one galaxy to the next.
Keywords
galaxies: fundamental parameters, galaxies: nuclei, galaxies: spiral, infrared: galaxies, submillimeter: galaxies, DUST EMISSION

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Chicago
Sauvage, M, N Sacchi, GJ Bendo, A Boselli, M Pohlen, CD Wilson, R Auld, et al. 2010. “The Central Region of Spiral Galaxies as Seen by Herschel : M81, M99 and M100.” Astronomy & Astrophysics 518.
APA
Sauvage, M., Sacchi, N., Bendo, G., Boselli, A., Pohlen, M., Wilson, C., Auld, R., et al. (2010). The central region of spiral galaxies as seen by Herschel : M81, M99 and M100. ASTRONOMY & ASTROPHYSICS, 518.
Vancouver
1.
Sauvage M, Sacchi N, Bendo G, Boselli A, Pohlen M, Wilson C, et al. The central region of spiral galaxies as seen by Herschel : M81, M99 and M100. ASTRONOMY & ASTROPHYSICS. 2010;518.
MLA
Sauvage, M, N Sacchi, GJ Bendo, et al. “The Central Region of Spiral Galaxies as Seen by Herschel : M81, M99 and M100.” ASTRONOMY & ASTROPHYSICS 518 (2010): n. pag. Print.
@article{1237139,
  abstract     = {With appropriate spatial resolution, images of spiral galaxies in thermal infrared (similar to 10 mu m and beyond) often reveal a bright central component, distinct from the stellar bulge, superimposed on a disk with prominent spiral arms. ISO and Spitzer studies have shown that much of the scatter in the mid-infrared colors of spiral galaxies is related to changes in the relative importance of these two components, rather than to other modifications, such as the morphological type or star formation rate, that affect the properties of the galaxy as a whole. With the Herschel imaging capability from 70 to 500 mu m, we revisit this two-component approach at longer wavelengths, to see if it still provides a working description of the brightness distribution of galaxies, and to determine its implications on the interpretation of global far-infrared properties of galaxies. We quantify the luminosity of the central component by both a decomposition of the radial surface brightness profile and a direct extraction in 2D. We find the central component contribution is variable within the three galaxies in our sample, possibly connected more directly to the presence of a bar than to the morphological type. The central component's relative contribution is at its maximum in the mid-infrared range and drops around 160 mu m to reach a constant value beyond 200 mu m. The central component contains a greater fraction of hot dust than the disk component, and while the colors of the central components are scattered, colors of the disk components are more homogenous from one galaxy to the next.},
  articleno    = {L64},
  author       = {Sauvage, M and Sacchi, N and Bendo, GJ and Boselli, A and Pohlen, M and Wilson, CD and Auld, R and Baes, Maarten and Barlow, MJ and Bock, JJ and Bradford, M and Buat, V and Castro-Rodriguez, N and Chanial, P and Charlot, S and Ciesla, L and Clements, DL and Cooray, A and Cormier, D and Cortese, L and Davies, JI and Dwek, E and Eales, SA and Elbaz, D and Galametz, M and Galliano, F and Gear, WK and Glenn, J and Gomez, HL and Griffin, M and Hony, S and Isaak, KG and Levenson, LR and Lu, N and Madden, SC and O'Halloran, B and Okumura, K and Oliver, S and Page, MJ and Panuzzo, P and Papageorgiou, A and Parkin, TJ and Perez-Fournon, I and Rangwala, N and Rigby, EE and Roussel, H and Rykala, A and Schulz, B and Schirm, MRP and Smith, MWL and Spinoglio, L and Stevens, JA and Srinivasan, S and Symeonidis, M and Trichas, M and Vaccari, M and Vigroux, L and Wozniak, H and Wright, GS and Zeilinger, WW},
  issn         = {0004-6361},
  journal      = {ASTRONOMY \& ASTROPHYSICS},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {5},
  title        = {The central region of spiral galaxies as seen by Herschel : M81, M99 and M100},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201014588},
  volume       = {518},
  year         = {2010},
}

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