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Frequency of and subjective response to critical incidents in the prediction of PTSD in emergency personnel

(2011) JOURNAL OF TRAUMATIC STRESS. 24(1). p.133-136
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Abstract
In this study, the authors compared the respective contribution of an individual's subjective response and the frequency of exposure to critical incidents to the development of symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a sample of 136 nurses and ambulance personnel working in military facilities. They found no relationship between the frequency of encountered critical incidents and the occurrence of PTSD symptoms. The subjective response to a stressor contributed to the development of PTSD symptoms and was most strongly associated with intrusion, partial eta squared = .23, and hyperarousal symptoms, partial eta squared = .16 Stressors that elicited the most intense affects within this population were those involving children and those where workers encountered limitations in supplies and resources.
Keywords
AMBULANCE PERSONNEL, POSTTRAUMATIC-STRESS-DISORDER, SEVERITY, NURSES

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Citation

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MLA
Declercq, Frédéric, et al. “Frequency of and Subjective Response to Critical Incidents in the Prediction of PTSD in Emergency Personnel.” JOURNAL OF TRAUMATIC STRESS, vol. 24, no. 1, 2011, pp. 133–36.
APA
Declercq, F., Meganck, R., Deheegher, J., & Van Hoorde, H. (2011). Frequency of and subjective response to critical incidents in the prediction of PTSD in emergency personnel. JOURNAL OF TRAUMATIC STRESS, 24(1), 133–136.
Chicago author-date
Declercq, Frédéric, Reitske Meganck, John Deheegher, and Hubert Van Hoorde. 2011. “Frequency of and Subjective Response to Critical Incidents in the Prediction of PTSD in Emergency Personnel.” JOURNAL OF TRAUMATIC STRESS 24 (1): 133–36.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Declercq, Frédéric, Reitske Meganck, John Deheegher, and Hubert Van Hoorde. 2011. “Frequency of and Subjective Response to Critical Incidents in the Prediction of PTSD in Emergency Personnel.” JOURNAL OF TRAUMATIC STRESS 24 (1): 133–136.
Vancouver
1.
Declercq F, Meganck R, Deheegher J, Van Hoorde H. Frequency of and subjective response to critical incidents in the prediction of PTSD in emergency personnel. JOURNAL OF TRAUMATIC STRESS. 2011;24(1):133–6.
IEEE
[1]
F. Declercq, R. Meganck, J. Deheegher, and H. Van Hoorde, “Frequency of and subjective response to critical incidents in the prediction of PTSD in emergency personnel,” JOURNAL OF TRAUMATIC STRESS, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 133–136, 2011.
@article{1234364,
  abstract     = {{In this study, the authors compared the respective contribution of an individual's subjective response and the frequency of exposure to critical incidents to the development of symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a sample of 136 nurses and ambulance personnel working in military facilities. They found no relationship between the frequency of encountered critical incidents and the occurrence of PTSD symptoms. The subjective response to a stressor contributed to the development of PTSD symptoms and was most strongly associated with intrusion, partial eta squared = .23, and hyperarousal symptoms, partial eta squared = .16 Stressors that elicited the most intense affects within this population were those involving children and those where workers encountered limitations in supplies and resources.}},
  author       = {{Declercq, Frédéric and Meganck, Reitske and Deheegher, John and Van Hoorde, Hubert}},
  issn         = {{0894-9867}},
  journal      = {{JOURNAL OF TRAUMATIC STRESS}},
  keywords     = {{AMBULANCE PERSONNEL,POSTTRAUMATIC-STRESS-DISORDER,SEVERITY,NURSES}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{1}},
  pages        = {{133--136}},
  title        = {{Frequency of and subjective response to critical incidents in the prediction of PTSD in emergency personnel}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jts.20609}},
  volume       = {{24}},
  year         = {{2011}},
}

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