Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

Vegetarianism, female gender and increasing age, but not CNDP1 genotype, are associated with reduced muscle carnosine levels in humans

Inge Everaert UGent, Antien Mooyaart, Audrey Baguet UGent, Ana Zutinic, Hans Baelde, Eric Achten UGent, Youri Taes UGent, Emile De Heer and Wim Derave UGent (2011) AMINO ACIDS. 40(4). p.1221-1229
abstract
Carnosine is found in high concentrations in skeletal muscles, where it is involved in several physiological functions. The muscle carnosine content measured within a population can vary by a factor 4. The aim of this study was to further characterize suggested determinants of the muscle carnosine content (diet, gender and age) and to identify new determinants (plasma carnosinase activity and testosterone). We investigated a group of 149 healthy subjects, which consisted of 94 men (12 vegetarians) and 55 women. Muscle carnosine was quantified in M. soleus, gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior using magnetic resonance proton spectroscopy and blood samples were collected to determine CNDP1 genotype, plasma carnosinase activity and testosterone concentrations. Compared to women, men have 36, 28 and 82% higher carnosine concentrations in M. soleus, gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscle, respectively, whereas circulating testosterone concentrations were unrelated to muscle carnosine levels in healthy men. The carnosine content of the M. soleus is negatively related to the subjects' age. Vegetarians have a lower carnosine content of 26% in gastrocnemius compared to omnivores. In contrast, there is no difference in muscle carnosine content between omnivores with a high or low ingestion of beta-alanine. Muscle carnosine levels are not related to the polymorphism of the CNDP1 gene or to the enzymatic activity of the plasma carnosinase. In conclusion, neither CNDP1 genotype nor the normal variation in circulating testosterone levels affects the muscular carnosine content, whereas vegetarianism, female gender and increasing age are the factors associated with reduced muscle carnosine stores.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Gender, Age, Carnosine, GENE CNDP1, Vegetarianism, RAT SKELETAL, LEUCINE REPEAT, ENZYME-ACTIVITIES, SERUM CARNOSINASE, EXERCISE PERFORMANCE, DIABETIC-NEPHROPATHY, SKELETAL-MUSCLE, VASTUS LATERALIS MUSCLE, BETA-ALANINE SUPPLEMENTATION, Androgens, CNDP1 genotype
journal title
AMINO ACIDS
Amino Acids
volume
40
issue
4
pages
1221 - 1229
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000288546700019
JCR category
BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
3.248 (2011)
JCR rank
115/286 (2011)
JCR quartile
2 (2011)
ISSN
0939-4451
DOI
10.1007/s00726-010-0749-2
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1234348
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1234348
date created
2011-05-24 15:45:56
date last changed
2011-06-01 09:42:32
@article{1234348,
  abstract     = {Carnosine is found in high concentrations in skeletal muscles, where it is involved in several physiological functions. The muscle carnosine content measured within a population can vary by a factor 4. The aim of this study was to further characterize suggested determinants of the muscle carnosine content (diet, gender and age) and to identify new determinants (plasma carnosinase activity and testosterone). We investigated a group of 149 healthy subjects, which consisted of 94 men (12 vegetarians) and 55 women. Muscle carnosine was quantified in M. soleus, gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior using magnetic resonance proton spectroscopy and blood samples were collected to determine CNDP1 genotype, plasma carnosinase activity and testosterone concentrations. Compared to women, men have 36, 28 and 82\% higher carnosine concentrations in M. soleus, gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscle, respectively, whereas circulating testosterone concentrations were unrelated to muscle carnosine levels in healthy men. The carnosine content of the M. soleus is negatively related to the subjects' age. Vegetarians have a lower carnosine content of 26\% in gastrocnemius compared to omnivores. In contrast, there is no difference in muscle carnosine content between omnivores with a high or low ingestion of beta-alanine. Muscle carnosine levels are not related to the polymorphism of the CNDP1 gene or to the enzymatic activity of the plasma carnosinase. In conclusion, neither CNDP1 genotype nor the normal variation in circulating testosterone levels affects the muscular carnosine content, whereas vegetarianism, female gender and increasing age are the factors associated with reduced muscle carnosine stores.},
  author       = {Everaert, Inge and Mooyaart, Antien and Baguet, Audrey and Zutinic, Ana and Baelde, Hans and Achten, Eric and Taes, Youri and De Heer, Emile and Derave, Wim},
  issn         = {0939-4451},
  journal      = {AMINO ACIDS},
  keyword      = {Gender,Age,Carnosine,GENE CNDP1,Vegetarianism,RAT SKELETAL,LEUCINE REPEAT,ENZYME-ACTIVITIES,SERUM CARNOSINASE,EXERCISE PERFORMANCE,DIABETIC-NEPHROPATHY,SKELETAL-MUSCLE,VASTUS LATERALIS MUSCLE,BETA-ALANINE SUPPLEMENTATION,Androgens,CNDP1 genotype},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {1221--1229},
  title        = {Vegetarianism, female gender and increasing age, but not CNDP1 genotype, are associated with reduced muscle carnosine levels in humans},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00726-010-0749-2},
  volume       = {40},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Everaert, Inge, Antien Mooyaart, Audrey Baguet, Ana Zutinic, Hans Baelde, Eric Achten, Youri Taes, Emile De Heer, and Wim Derave. 2011. “Vegetarianism, Female Gender and Increasing Age, but Not CNDP1 Genotype, Are Associated with Reduced Muscle Carnosine Levels in Humans.” Amino Acids 40 (4): 1221–1229.
APA
Everaert, I., Mooyaart, A., Baguet, A., Zutinic, A., Baelde, H., Achten, E., Taes, Y., et al. (2011). Vegetarianism, female gender and increasing age, but not CNDP1 genotype, are associated with reduced muscle carnosine levels in humans. AMINO ACIDS, 40(4), 1221–1229.
Vancouver
1.
Everaert I, Mooyaart A, Baguet A, Zutinic A, Baelde H, Achten E, et al. Vegetarianism, female gender and increasing age, but not CNDP1 genotype, are associated with reduced muscle carnosine levels in humans. AMINO ACIDS. 2011;40(4):1221–9.
MLA
Everaert, Inge, Antien Mooyaart, Audrey Baguet, et al. “Vegetarianism, Female Gender and Increasing Age, but Not CNDP1 Genotype, Are Associated with Reduced Muscle Carnosine Levels in Humans.” AMINO ACIDS 40.4 (2011): 1221–1229. Print.