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Genetic, environmental and maternal effects on magpie nestling-fitness traits under different nutritional conditions: a new experimental approach

Liesbeth De Neve, Juan José Soler, Tomás Pérez-Contreras and Manuel Soler (2004) EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY RESEARCH. 6(3). p.415-431
abstract
Rearing full siblings under different environmental conditions allows partitioning of the total phenotypic variance of a trait into its genetic and environmental components. This, in natural bird populations, is usually achieved by cross-fostering experimental designs. We estimated genetic and environmental components of nestling-fitness traits using an alternative experimental approach in a magpie (Pica pica) population. Two broods of full siblings were reared under contrasting environmental conditions of first and replacement clutches. With this approach, potential maternal effects related to differences in clutch size and egg size could also be partially evaluated. In addition, the nutritional condition of half of the nestlings within each nest was manipulated by providing a calorie-rich paste enriched with micronutrients. Our results are only indicative because of very low sample sizes. In food-supplemented nestlings, the heritability estimates of tarsus length, body mass and T-cell-mediated immune response tended to be higher compared with control nestlings. No causal conclusions could be drawn for changes in heritability estimates of body mass and T-cell-mediated immune response; for tarsus length, the results suggest a lower potential to adapt to poor nutritional conditions. Furthermore, we found some indication that maternal effects related to clutch/egg size inflated causal estimates of phenotypic variance in tarsus length.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
magpie, food supplementation, tarsus length, GREAT SPOTTED CUCKOO, immune response, quantitative genetics, Pica pica, FLEDGLING AMERICAN KESTRELS, maternal effects, OFFSPRING CONDITION, CLAMATOR-GLANDARIUS, DROSOPHILA-MELANOGASTER, BODY-SIZE, BARN SWALLOWS, MEDIATED IMMUNE-RESPONSE, MALE ATTRACTIVENESS, body mass, COLLARED FLYCATCHER
journal title
EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY RESEARCH
Evol. Ecol. Res.
volume
6
issue
3
pages
415 - 431
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000220685800006
JCR category
ECOLOGY
JCR impact factor
1.548 (2004)
JCR rank
46/107 (2004)
JCR quartile
2 (2004)
ISSN
1522-0613
language
English
UGent publication?
no
classification
A1
id
1233244
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1233244
date created
2011-05-24 12:43:49
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:44:50
@article{1233244,
  abstract     = {Rearing full siblings under different environmental conditions allows partitioning of the total phenotypic variance of a trait into its genetic and environmental components. This, in natural bird populations, is usually achieved by cross-fostering experimental designs. We estimated genetic and environmental components of nestling-fitness traits using an alternative experimental approach in a magpie (Pica pica) population. Two broods of full siblings were reared under contrasting environmental conditions of first and replacement clutches. With this approach, potential maternal effects related to differences in clutch size and egg size could also be partially evaluated. In addition, the nutritional condition of half of the nestlings within each nest was manipulated by providing a calorie-rich paste enriched with micronutrients. Our results are only indicative because of very low sample sizes. In food-supplemented nestlings, the heritability estimates of tarsus length, body mass and T-cell-mediated immune response tended to be higher compared with control nestlings. No causal conclusions could be drawn for changes in heritability estimates of body mass and T-cell-mediated immune response; for tarsus length, the results suggest a lower potential to adapt to poor nutritional conditions. Furthermore, we found some indication that maternal effects related to clutch/egg size inflated causal estimates of phenotypic variance in tarsus length.},
  author       = {De Neve, Liesbeth and Soler, Juan Jos{\'e} and P{\'e}rez-Contreras, Tom{\'a}s and Soler, Manuel},
  issn         = {1522-0613},
  journal      = {EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY RESEARCH},
  keyword      = {magpie,food supplementation,tarsus length,GREAT SPOTTED CUCKOO,immune response,quantitative genetics,Pica pica,FLEDGLING AMERICAN KESTRELS,maternal effects,OFFSPRING CONDITION,CLAMATOR-GLANDARIUS,DROSOPHILA-MELANOGASTER,BODY-SIZE,BARN SWALLOWS,MEDIATED IMMUNE-RESPONSE,MALE ATTRACTIVENESS,body mass,COLLARED FLYCATCHER},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {415--431},
  title        = {Genetic, environmental and maternal effects on magpie nestling-fitness traits under different nutritional conditions: a new experimental approach},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2004},
}

Chicago
De Neve, Liesbeth, Juan José Soler, Tomás Pérez-Contreras, and Manuel Soler. 2004. “Genetic, Environmental and Maternal Effects on Magpie Nestling-fitness Traits Under Different Nutritional Conditions: a New Experimental Approach.” Evolutionary Ecology Research 6 (3): 415–431.
APA
De Neve, L., Soler, J. J., Pérez-Contreras, T., & Soler, M. (2004). Genetic, environmental and maternal effects on magpie nestling-fitness traits under different nutritional conditions: a new experimental approach. EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY RESEARCH, 6(3), 415–431.
Vancouver
1.
De Neve L, Soler JJ, Pérez-Contreras T, Soler M. Genetic, environmental and maternal effects on magpie nestling-fitness traits under different nutritional conditions: a new experimental approach. EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY RESEARCH. 2004;6(3):415–31.
MLA
De Neve, Liesbeth, Juan José Soler, Tomás Pérez-Contreras, et al. “Genetic, Environmental and Maternal Effects on Magpie Nestling-fitness Traits Under Different Nutritional Conditions: a New Experimental Approach.” EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY RESEARCH 6.3 (2004): 415–431. Print.