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Word-final prolongations in an adult male with neurofibromatosis type 1

Marjan Cosyns (UGent) , Geert Mortier (UGent) , Paul Corthals (UGent) , Sandra Janssens (UGent) and John Van Borsel (UGent)
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Organization
Abstract
Introduction and aims of the study: Stutter-like disfluencies occur predominantly on first syllables of words. Moreover, it has been hypothesized that stuttering comprises the initiation of syllables. Nonetheless, the occurrence of word-final disfluencies (WFD) has been reported in literature. WFD have been mentioned in association with neurogenic stuttering, but have also been observed in individuals without apparent acquired neurological damage. In most cases reported this far, WFD consisted of repetitions. Only two studies reported on the occurrence of final prolongations. As word-final prolongations (WFP) seem to be an unusual phenomenon, the purpose of the present study is to add to the database by documenting another case of WFP. Methods: The participant of this study (K.) was a 49-year-old male with neurofibromatosis type 1. Speech samples were collected in five different speech modalities (i.e., spontaneous speech, monologue, repetition, automatic series and reading). A detailed fluency analysis was executed in a semi-automatic manner using Praat software. Results: K’s overall disfluency index amounted to 11.05 with prolongations being the predominant disfluency type. Actually, somewhat less than two thirds of all disfluencies displayed consisted of prolongations. These almost invariably occurred in a word-final position. WFP accounted for 10.84% of the speaking time and lasted on average 0.40 seconds. It appeared that some linguistic loci were more likely to be affected by WFP than others. WFP occurred more frequently in content words, multisyllabic words and words at the end of a sentence than in function words, monosyllabic words and words located sentence initially and medially. The sounds most frequently involved were /t/, /s/, /p/ and /r/. Conclusions: Although the disfluencies displayed by K. do not fully correspond to the pattern of behaviors called stuttering, they at least appear to be stuttering-related. WFP might reflect cognitive processing difficulties or relate to speech motor aspects. One could say that K. showed difficulties terminating words.

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Chicago
Cosyns, Marjan, Geert Mortier, Paul Corthals, Sandra Janssens, and John Van Borsel. 2010. “Word-final Prolongations in an Adult Male with Neurofibromatosis Type 1.” In 28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics (IALP - 2010), Abstracts.
APA
Cosyns, Marjan, Mortier, G., Corthals, P., Janssens, S., & Van Borsel, J. (2010). Word-final prolongations in an adult male with neurofibromatosis type 1. 28th world congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics (IALP - 2010), Abstracts. Presented at the 28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics (IALP - 2010).
Vancouver
1.
Cosyns M, Mortier G, Corthals P, Janssens S, Van Borsel J. Word-final prolongations in an adult male with neurofibromatosis type 1. 28th world congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics (IALP - 2010), Abstracts. 2010.
MLA
Cosyns, Marjan, Geert Mortier, Paul Corthals, et al. “Word-final Prolongations in an Adult Male with Neurofibromatosis Type 1.” 28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics (IALP - 2010), Abstracts. 2010. Print.
@inproceedings{1231523,
  abstract     = {Introduction and aims of the study: Stutter-like disfluencies occur predominantly on first syllables of words. Moreover, it has been hypothesized that stuttering comprises the initiation of syllables. Nonetheless, the occurrence of word-final disfluencies (WFD) has been reported in literature. WFD have been mentioned in association with neurogenic stuttering, but have also been observed in individuals without apparent acquired neurological damage. In most cases reported this far, WFD consisted of repetitions. Only two studies reported on the occurrence of final prolongations. As word-final prolongations (WFP) seem to be an unusual phenomenon, the purpose of the present study is to add to the database by documenting another case of WFP. Methods: The participant of this study (K.) was a 49-year-old male with neurofibromatosis type 1. Speech samples were collected in five different speech modalities (i.e., spontaneous speech, monologue, repetition, automatic series and reading). A detailed fluency analysis was executed in a semi-automatic manner using Praat software. Results: K’s overall disfluency index amounted to 11.05 with prolongations being the predominant disfluency type. Actually, somewhat less than two thirds of all disfluencies displayed consisted of prolongations. These almost invariably occurred in a word-final position. WFP accounted for 10.84% of the speaking time and lasted on average 0.40 seconds. It appeared that some linguistic loci were more likely to be affected by WFP than others. WFP occurred more frequently in content words, multisyllabic words and words at the end of a sentence than in function words, monosyllabic words and words located sentence initially and medially. The sounds most frequently involved were /t/, /s/, /p/ and /r/. Conclusions: Although the disfluencies displayed by K. do not fully correspond to the pattern of behaviors called stuttering, they at least appear to be stuttering-related. WFP might reflect cognitive processing difficulties or relate to speech motor aspects. One could say that K. showed difficulties terminating words.},
  author       = {Cosyns, Marjan and Mortier, Geert and Corthals, Paul and Janssens, Sandra and Van Borsel, John},
  booktitle    = {28th world congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics (IALP - 2010), Abstracts},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Athens, Greece},
  title        = {Word-final prolongations in an adult male with neurofibromatosis type 1},
  year         = {2010},
}