Advanced search
1 file | 157.07 KB Add to list

Estimation of Acacia tortilis tree attributes in Bou-Hedma, Tunisia: an object-based approach

Author
Organization
Abstract
Acacia tortilis subsp. raddiana is an important woody species in the pre-Saharan Tunisia zone. The species is able to tolerate extreme drought (in the range of 20 to 200 mm), through special adaptations such as a deep lateral root and partial repelling of leafs in the dry season. It is the only forest tree persisting on the edge of the desert and is therefore considered a keystone species (Abdallah et al., 2008). The restoration of the original woodland combating desertification, particularly by afforestation and reforestation, is therefore an important research activity in the Bou-Hedma region. The restoration goes hand in hand with a climate change in the Biosphere Reserve. The impact of this local climate change is also felt outside the Biosphere Reserve, where the local rural population depends on rain fed agriculture and the water resources originating from water infiltrated on the mountains of the Bou-Hedma mountain chain. This change in climate conditions has been directly observable on the mountain chain, where Stipa tenacissima (Poaceae) now grows without human intervention. However, scientific documentation remains scarce. In order to study the different effects of woodland restoration in Bou-Hedma, the number of Acacia trees (individuals and tree groups) and their attributes need to be accurately estimated, and that is exactly the focus our study.

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 157.07 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Vancoillie, Frieke, Kevin Delaplace, Robert De Wulf, et al. “Estimation of Acacia Tortilis Tree Attributes in Bou-Hedma, Tunisia: An Object-based Approach.” ForestSat 2010, Proceedings. 2010. Print.
APA
Vancoillie, Frieke, Delaplace, K., De Wulf, R., Gabriels, D., De Smet, K., Ouessar, M., Ouled Belgacem, A., et al. (2010). Estimation of Acacia tortilis tree attributes in Bou-Hedma, Tunisia: an object-based approach. ForestSat 2010, Proceedings. Presented at the ForestSat 2010 : Operational tools in forestry using remote sensing techniques.
Chicago author-date
Vancoillie, Frieke, Kevin Delaplace, Robert De Wulf, Donald Gabriels, Koen De Smet, Mohammed Ouessar, Azaiez Ouled Belgacem, and Houcine Taamallah. 2010. “Estimation of Acacia Tortilis Tree Attributes in Bou-Hedma, Tunisia: An Object-based Approach.” In ForestSat 2010, Proceedings.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Vancoillie, Frieke, Kevin Delaplace, Robert De Wulf, Donald Gabriels, Koen De Smet, Mohammed Ouessar, Azaiez Ouled Belgacem, and Houcine Taamallah. 2010. “Estimation of Acacia Tortilis Tree Attributes in Bou-Hedma, Tunisia: An Object-based Approach.” In ForestSat 2010, Proceedings.
Vancouver
1.
Vancoillie F, Delaplace K, De Wulf R, Gabriels D, De Smet K, Ouessar M, et al. Estimation of Acacia tortilis tree attributes in Bou-Hedma, Tunisia: an object-based approach. ForestSat 2010, Proceedings. 2010.
IEEE
[1]
F. Vancoillie et al., “Estimation of Acacia tortilis tree attributes in Bou-Hedma, Tunisia: an object-based approach,” in ForestSat 2010, Proceedings, Lugo ; Santiago de Compostela, Spain, 2010.
@inproceedings{1220256,
  abstract     = {Acacia tortilis subsp. raddiana is an important woody species in the pre-Saharan Tunisia zone. The species is able to tolerate extreme drought (in the range of 20 to 200 mm), through special adaptations such as a deep lateral root and partial repelling of leafs in the dry season. It is the only forest tree persisting on the edge of the desert and is therefore considered a keystone species (Abdallah et al., 2008). The restoration of the original woodland combating desertification, particularly by afforestation and reforestation, is therefore an important research activity in the Bou-Hedma region. The restoration goes hand in hand with a climate change in the Biosphere Reserve. The impact of this local climate change is also felt outside the Biosphere Reserve, where the local rural population depends on rain fed agriculture and the water resources originating from water infiltrated on the mountains of the Bou-Hedma mountain chain. This change in climate conditions has been directly observable on the mountain chain, where Stipa tenacissima (Poaceae) now grows without human intervention. However, scientific documentation remains scarce. In order to study the different effects of woodland restoration in Bou-Hedma, the number of Acacia trees (individuals and tree groups) and their attributes need to be accurately estimated, and that is exactly the focus our study.},
  author       = {Vancoillie, Frieke and Delaplace, Kevin and De Wulf, Robert and Gabriëls, Donald and De Smet, Koen and Ouessar, Mohammed and Ouled Belgacem, Azaiez and Taamallah, Houcine},
  booktitle    = {ForestSat 2010, Proceedings},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Lugo ; Santiago de Compostela, Spain},
  pages        = {5},
  title        = {Estimation of Acacia tortilis tree attributes in Bou-Hedma, Tunisia: an object-based approach},
  year         = {2010},
}