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On the association between adolescent autonomy and psychosocial functioning: examining decisional independence from a self-determination theory perspective

Stijn Van Petegem UGent, Wim Beyers UGent, Maarten Vansteenkiste UGent and Bart Soenens UGent (2012) DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY. 48(1). p.76-88
abstract
In the present study, we focus on the concept of adolescent autonomy and its relation with psychosocial functioning. Specifically, we aim to differentiate between 2 prevailing conceptualizations of autonomy, that is, (a) autonomy defined as independence versus dependence and (b) autonomy defined as self-endorsed versus controlled functioning. A 2nd goal is to examine the relative contribution of each autonomy operationalization in the prediction of adolescents' adjustment (i.e., well-being, problem behavior, and intimacy). Data were gathered in a sample of 707 Belgian adolescents. Using a newly developed questionnaire, we assessed both the degree of independent decision making per se and the self-endorsed versus controlled motives underlying both independent and dependent decision making. The degree of independent decision making could clearly be differentiated from the underlying motives for doing so. Moreover, independent decision making as such showed unique associations with more problem behavior. Further, as expected, self-endorsed motives for both independent and dependent decision making generally related to an adaptive pattern of psychosocial functioning, and controlled motives were associated with maladjustment. The discussion focuses on the difference between the 2 perspectives on autonomy and on the different meaning of the motives underlying independent, relative to dependent, decision making.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
AFRICAN-AMERICAN ADOLESCENTS, INTRINSIC MOTIVATION, PARENTAL PSYCHOLOGICAL CONTROL, SEPARATION-INDIVIDUATION, EMERGING ADULTHOOD, UNITED-STATES, FIT INDEXES, FAMILY, ADJUSTMENT, SUPPORT, autonomy, independence, Self-Determination Theory, adolescence, adjustment
journal title
DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
Dev. psychol.
volume
48
issue
1
pages
76 - 88
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000298965200008
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY, DEVELOPMENTAL
JCR impact factor
2.976 (2012)
JCR rank
13/65 (2012)
JCR quartile
1 (2012)
ISSN
0012-1649
DOI
10.1037/a0025307
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1219086
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1219086
date created
2011-05-06 15:19:04
date last changed
2012-01-31 09:33:06
@article{1219086,
  abstract     = {In the present study, we focus on the concept of adolescent autonomy and its relation with psychosocial functioning. Specifically, we aim to differentiate between 2 prevailing conceptualizations of autonomy, that is, (a) autonomy defined as independence versus dependence and (b) autonomy defined as self-endorsed versus controlled functioning. A 2nd goal is to examine the relative contribution of each autonomy operationalization in the prediction of adolescents' adjustment (i.e., well-being, problem behavior, and intimacy). Data were gathered in a sample of 707 Belgian adolescents. Using a newly developed questionnaire, we assessed both the degree of independent decision making per se and the self-endorsed versus controlled motives underlying both independent and dependent decision making. The degree of independent decision making could clearly be differentiated from the underlying motives for doing so. Moreover, independent decision making as such showed unique associations with more problem behavior. Further, as expected, self-endorsed motives for both independent and dependent decision making generally related to an adaptive pattern of psychosocial functioning, and controlled motives were associated with maladjustment. The discussion focuses on the difference between the 2 perspectives on autonomy and on the different meaning of the motives underlying independent, relative to dependent, decision making.},
  author       = {Van Petegem, Stijn and Beyers, Wim and Vansteenkiste, Maarten and Soenens, Bart},
  issn         = {0012-1649},
  journal      = {DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY},
  keyword      = {AFRICAN-AMERICAN ADOLESCENTS,INTRINSIC MOTIVATION,PARENTAL PSYCHOLOGICAL CONTROL,SEPARATION-INDIVIDUATION,EMERGING ADULTHOOD,UNITED-STATES,FIT INDEXES,FAMILY,ADJUSTMENT,SUPPORT,autonomy,independence,Self-Determination Theory,adolescence,adjustment},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {76--88},
  title        = {On the association between adolescent autonomy and psychosocial functioning: examining decisional independence from a self-determination theory perspective},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0025307},
  volume       = {48},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Van Petegem, Stijn, Wim Beyers, Maarten Vansteenkiste, and Bart Soenens. 2012. “On the Association Between Adolescent Autonomy and Psychosocial Functioning: Examining Decisional Independence from a Self-determination Theory Perspective.” Developmental Psychology 48 (1): 76–88.
APA
Van Petegem, Stijn, Beyers, W., Vansteenkiste, M., & Soenens, B. (2012). On the association between adolescent autonomy and psychosocial functioning: examining decisional independence from a self-determination theory perspective. DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY, 48(1), 76–88.
Vancouver
1.
Van Petegem S, Beyers W, Vansteenkiste M, Soenens B. On the association between adolescent autonomy and psychosocial functioning: examining decisional independence from a self-determination theory perspective. DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY. 2012;48(1):76–88.
MLA
Van Petegem, Stijn, Wim Beyers, Maarten Vansteenkiste, et al. “On the Association Between Adolescent Autonomy and Psychosocial Functioning: Examining Decisional Independence from a Self-determination Theory Perspective.” DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 48.1 (2012): 76–88. Print.