Advanced search
1 file | 2.15 MB

Assessment of ELISA and PCR assays for allergen detection in food: a comparative study on hazelnut and soy

(2011)
Author
Promoter
(UGent) and Isabel Taverniers
Organization
Abstract
Food allergy is one of the most important world health problems due to its increasing prevalence and the seriousness of associated reactions. Correct labelling of allergens on the myriad of food products they can be contained in is dependent on accurate detection methods. However, those methods are often unclear about what is detected and how the results are expressed and/or should be interpreted. The lack of official methods and standards for method validation further complicates this matter. In this research, we evaluated in depth new (real-time PCR) and existing commercial (ELISA and real-time PCR) methods for hazelnut and soy detection. The non-uniform use of different standards and units to express the allergen concentration makes it difficult to compare these tests to one another. Nevertheless, it can be concluded that the analytical results strongly depend on the assay used. This study has demonstrated that the target analyte is highly affected by food processing, which in turn affects the detection results. Devastating effects on the sensitivity of the detection were observed in our study, which in practice may lead to inaccurate labelling due to non-detection of existing allergens. This would place allergic patients at risk. These research results moreover illustrate the limited applicability of a detection method, which is often only marginally defined. Co-ingredients can also affect the results. In our experiments, cross-reactivity with other food products led to false-positive results, and a negative effect of the matrix on the analyte detection could also be demonstrated. This work highlights the urgent need for international harmonisation regarding allergen detection. Official validation needs to become a priority to guarantee reliable allergen detection. Such validation requires definition and development of reference materials for allergens and a uniform way of expressing analytical results.
Keywords
real-time PCR, labelling, Food allergy, allergens, ELISA, hazelnut, soy

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 2.15 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Platteau, Céline. 2011. “Assessment of ELISA and PCR Assays for Allergen Detection in Food: a Comparative Study on Hazelnut and Soy”. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering.
APA
Platteau, Céline. (2011). Assessment of ELISA and PCR assays for allergen detection in food: a comparative study on hazelnut and soy. Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent, Belgium.
Vancouver
1.
Platteau C. Assessment of ELISA and PCR assays for allergen detection in food: a comparative study on hazelnut and soy. [Ghent, Belgium]: Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering; 2011.
MLA
Platteau, Céline. “Assessment of ELISA and PCR Assays for Allergen Detection in Food: a Comparative Study on Hazelnut and Soy.” 2011 : n. pag. Print.
@phdthesis{1214457,
  abstract     = {Food allergy is one of the most important world health problems due to its increasing prevalence and the seriousness of associated reactions. Correct labelling of allergens on the myriad of food products they can be contained in is dependent on accurate detection methods. However, those methods are often unclear about what is detected and how the results are expressed and/or should be interpreted. The lack of official methods and standards for method validation further complicates this matter. In this research, we evaluated in depth new (real-time PCR) and existing commercial (ELISA and real-time PCR) methods for hazelnut and soy detection. The non-uniform use of different standards and units to express the allergen concentration makes it difficult to compare these tests to one another. Nevertheless, it can be concluded that the analytical results strongly depend on the assay used. This study has demonstrated that the target analyte is highly affected by food processing, which in turn affects the detection results. Devastating effects on the sensitivity of the detection were observed in our study, which in practice may lead to inaccurate labelling due to non-detection of existing allergens. This would place allergic patients at risk. These research results moreover illustrate the limited applicability of a detection method, which is often only marginally defined. Co-ingredients can also affect the results. In our experiments, cross-reactivity with other food products led to false-positive results, and a negative effect of the matrix on the analyte detection could also be demonstrated. This work highlights the urgent need for international harmonisation regarding allergen detection. Official validation needs to become a priority to guarantee reliable allergen detection. Such validation requires definition and development of reference materials for allergens and a uniform way of expressing analytical results.},
  author       = {Platteau, C{\'e}line},
  isbn         = {9789059894327},
  keyword      = {real-time PCR,labelling,Food allergy,allergens,ELISA,hazelnut,soy},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {252},
  publisher    = {Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering},
  school       = {Ghent University},
  title        = {Assessment of ELISA and PCR assays for allergen detection in food: a comparative study on hazelnut and soy},
  year         = {2011},
}