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The impact of voice disorders among teachers: vocal complaints, treatment-seeking behavior, knowledge of vocal care, and voice-related absenteeism

EVELYNE VAN HOUTTE UGent, Kristiane Van Lierde UGent, Floris Wuyts and Sofie Claeys UGent (2011) JOURNAL OF VOICE. 25(5). p.570-575
abstract
OBJECTIVES: Teachers are at increased risk for developing voice disorders. Occupational risk factors have been extensively examined; however, little attention has been paid to the consequences of the vocal complaints. The objective of this study was to investigate the knowledge that teachers have about vocal care, treatment-seeking behavior, and voice-related absenteeism. METHODS: The study group comprised 994 teachers and 290 controls whose jobs did not involve vocal effort. All participants completed a questionnaire inquiring about vocal complaints, treatment-seeking behavior, voice-related absenteeism, and knowledge about vocal care. Comparisons were made between teachers with and without vocal complaints and with the control group. RESULTS: Teachers reported significantly more voice problems than the control population (51.2% vs 27.4%) (chi(2)=50.45, df=1, P<0.001). Female teachers reported significantly higher levels of voice disorders than their male colleagues (38% vs 13.2%, chi(2)=22.34, df=1, P<0.001). Teachers (25.4%) sought medical care and eventually 20.6% had missed at least 1 day of work because of voice problems. Female teachers were significantly more likely to seek medical help (chi(2)=7.24, df=1, P=0.007) and to stay at home (chi(2)=7.10, df=1, P=0.008) in comparison with their male colleagues. Only 13.5% of all teachers received information during their education. CONCLUSIONS: Voice disorders have an impact on teachers' personal and professional life and imply a major financial burden for society. A substantial number of teachers needed medical help and was obligated to stay at home because of voice problems. This study strongly recommends the implementation of vocal education during the training of teacher students to prepare the vocal professional user.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Voice disorders, Teachers, Voice-related occupational disease, RISK-FACTORS, GENERAL-POPULATION, PREVALENCE, FATIGUE, FREQUENCY
journal title
JOURNAL OF VOICE
J. Voice
volume
25
issue
5
pages
570 - 575
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000294792500009
JCR category
OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY
JCR impact factor
1.39 (2011)
JCR rank
15/41 (2011)
JCR quartile
2 (2011)
ISSN
0892-1997
DOI
10.1016/j.jvoice.2010.04.008
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1204571
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1204571
date created
2011-04-07 16:41:32
date last changed
2012-04-26 13:00:43
@article{1204571,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVES: Teachers are at increased risk for developing voice disorders. Occupational risk factors have been extensively examined; however, little attention has been paid to the consequences of the vocal complaints. The objective of this study was to investigate the knowledge that teachers have about vocal care, treatment-seeking behavior, and voice-related absenteeism.
METHODS: The study group comprised 994 teachers and 290 controls whose jobs did not involve vocal effort. All participants completed a questionnaire inquiring about vocal complaints, treatment-seeking behavior, voice-related absenteeism, and knowledge about vocal care. Comparisons were made between teachers with and without vocal complaints and with the control group.
RESULTS: Teachers reported significantly more voice problems than the control population (51.2\% vs 27.4\%) (chi(2)=50.45, df=1, P{\textlangle}0.001). Female teachers reported significantly higher levels of voice disorders than their male colleagues (38\% vs 13.2\%, chi(2)=22.34, df=1, P{\textlangle}0.001). Teachers (25.4\%) sought medical care and eventually 20.6\% had missed at least 1 day of work because of voice problems. Female teachers were significantly more likely to seek medical help (chi(2)=7.24, df=1, P=0.007) and to stay at home (chi(2)=7.10, df=1, P=0.008) in comparison with their male colleagues. Only 13.5\% of all teachers received information during their education.
CONCLUSIONS: Voice disorders have an impact on teachers' personal and professional life and imply a major financial burden for society. A substantial number of teachers needed medical help and was obligated to stay at home because of voice problems. This study strongly recommends the implementation of vocal education during the training of teacher students to prepare the vocal professional user.},
  author       = {VAN HOUTTE, EVELYNE and Van Lierde, Kristiane and Wuyts, Floris and Claeys, Sofie},
  issn         = {0892-1997},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF VOICE},
  keyword      = {Voice disorders,Teachers,Voice-related occupational disease,RISK-FACTORS,GENERAL-POPULATION,PREVALENCE,FATIGUE,FREQUENCY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {570--575},
  title        = {The impact of voice disorders among teachers: vocal complaints, treatment-seeking behavior, knowledge of vocal care, and voice-related absenteeism},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvoice.2010.04.008},
  volume       = {25},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
VAN HOUTTE, EVELYNE, Kristiane Van Lierde, Floris Wuyts, and Sofie Claeys. 2011. “The Impact of Voice Disorders Among Teachers: Vocal Complaints, Treatment-seeking Behavior, Knowledge of Vocal Care, and Voice-related Absenteeism.” Journal of Voice 25 (5): 570–575.
APA
VAN HOUTTE, E., Van Lierde, K., Wuyts, F., & Claeys, S. (2011). The impact of voice disorders among teachers: vocal complaints, treatment-seeking behavior, knowledge of vocal care, and voice-related absenteeism. JOURNAL OF VOICE, 25(5), 570–575.
Vancouver
1.
VAN HOUTTE E, Van Lierde K, Wuyts F, Claeys S. The impact of voice disorders among teachers: vocal complaints, treatment-seeking behavior, knowledge of vocal care, and voice-related absenteeism. JOURNAL OF VOICE. 2011;25(5):570–5.
MLA
VAN HOUTTE, EVELYNE, Kristiane Van Lierde, Floris Wuyts, et al. “The Impact of Voice Disorders Among Teachers: Vocal Complaints, Treatment-seeking Behavior, Knowledge of Vocal Care, and Voice-related Absenteeism.” JOURNAL OF VOICE 25.5 (2011): 570–575. Print.