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Genomic applications of laser capture microdissection

Mado Vandewoestyne UGent (2011)
abstract
This thesis focuses on the use of laser capture microdissection (LCM) in genomic applications. It aims to demonstrate that a wide variety of gene specific and genome wide analyses are possible after LCM. The thesis is divided into two major parts. In a first part, the use of LCM in forensic research is discussed. The introduction summarizes all possible forensic applications of LCM, gives an overview of the staining and detection options and reviews the DNA extraction protocols compatible with LCM of cells from forensic samples. This overview is followed by an evaluation of three DNA isolation methods after LCM. To conclude the first part of this thesis, two chapters describe the use of LCM in sexual assault cases. The second part of this thesis focuses on the use of LCM in clinical research. Three different disorders have been studied to indicate that LCM can be used in a very broad range of clinical applications. The first chapter after the introduction describes the use of LCM to isolate proliferating B-cells from pseudofollicles in lymph node sections of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The aim of this study was to demonstrate a clonal relationship between these cells and the accumulating leukemia cells in the blood of these patients. In the second chapter, LCM is used to isolate single peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with a mitochondrial point mutation leading to a neuromuscular disorder. Using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, the mutation load was determined in these single cells, showing a high intercellular variability in heteroplasmy. In the final chapter, LCM was used to isolate metastasized neuroblastoma cells from bone marrow aspirates. Subsequently, array-based comparative genomic hybridization (arrayCGH) profiles from the metastasized cells and the primary tumour were compared to demonstrate that these metastases can be used for diagnosis and prognosis in cases where primary tumors are not available.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
promoter
UGent and UGent
organization
year
type
dissertation (monograph)
subject
keyword
laser capture microdissection, genomics, DNA
pages
246 pages
publisher
Ghent University. Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences
place of publication
Ghent, Belgium
defense location
Gent : Farmaceutisch Instituut (auditorium II)
defense date
2011-04-04 19:00
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
D1
additional info
dissertation consists of copyrighted material
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1204289
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1204289
date created
2011-04-07 14:18:15
date last changed
2011-05-04 09:08:57
@phdthesis{1204289,
  abstract     = {This thesis focuses on the use of laser capture microdissection (LCM) in genomic applications. It aims to demonstrate that a wide variety of gene specific and genome wide analyses are possible after LCM.
The thesis is divided into two major parts. In a first part, the use of LCM in forensic research is discussed. The introduction summarizes all possible forensic applications of LCM, gives an overview of the staining and detection options and reviews the DNA extraction protocols compatible with LCM of cells from forensic samples. This overview is followed by an evaluation of three DNA isolation methods after LCM. To conclude the first part of this thesis, two chapters describe the use of LCM in sexual assault cases. 
The second part of this thesis focuses on the use of LCM in clinical research. Three different disorders have been studied to indicate that LCM can be used in a very broad range of clinical applications. The first chapter after the introduction describes the use of LCM to isolate proliferating B-cells from pseudofollicles in lymph node sections of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The aim of this study was to demonstrate a clonal relationship between these cells and the accumulating leukemia cells in the blood of these patients. 
In the second chapter, LCM is used to isolate single peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with a mitochondrial point mutation leading to a neuromuscular disorder. Using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, the mutation load was determined in these single cells, showing a high intercellular variability in heteroplasmy.
In the final chapter, LCM was used to isolate metastasized neuroblastoma cells from bone marrow aspirates. Subsequently, array-based comparative genomic hybridization (arrayCGH) profiles from the metastasized cells and the primary tumour were compared to demonstrate that these metastases can be used for diagnosis and prognosis in cases where primary tumors are not available.},
  author       = {Vandewoestyne, Mado},
  keyword      = {laser capture microdissection,genomics,DNA},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {246},
  publisher    = {Ghent University. Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences},
  school       = {Ghent University},
  title        = {Genomic applications of laser capture microdissection},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Vandewoestyne, Mado. 2011. “Genomic Applications of Laser Capture Microdissection”. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences.
APA
Vandewoestyne, M. (2011). Genomic applications of laser capture microdissection. Ghent University. Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ghent, Belgium.
Vancouver
1.
Vandewoestyne M. Genomic applications of laser capture microdissection. [Ghent, Belgium]: Ghent University. Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences; 2011.
MLA
Vandewoestyne, Mado. “Genomic Applications of Laser Capture Microdissection.” 2011 : n. pag. Print.