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Dying for a cause: NETosis, mechanisms behind an antimicrobial cell death modality

Quinten Remijsen UGent, TW Kuijpers, Ellen Wirawan, Saskia Lippens UGent, Peter Vandenabeele UGent and Tom Vanden Berghe UGent (2011) CELL DEATH AND DIFFERENTIATION. 18(4). p.581-588
abstract
Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are chromatin structures loaded with antimicrobial molecules. They can trap and kill various bacterial, fungal and protozoal pathogens, and their release is one of the first lines of defense against pathogens. In vivo, NETs are released during a form of pathogen-induced cell death, which was recently named NETosis. Ex vivo, both dead and viable neutrophils can be stimulated to release NETs composed of either nuclear or mitochondrial chromatin, respectively. In certain pathological conditions, NETs are associated with severe tissue damage or certain auto-immune diseases. This review describes the recent progress made in the identification of the mechanisms involved in NETosis and discusses its interplay with autophagy and apoptosis.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (review)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
superoxide, autophagy, NETosis, NADPH oxidase, cell death, NEUTROPHIL EXTRACELLULAR TRAPS, CHRONIC GRANULOMATOUS-DISEASE, NF-KAPPA-B, AUTOPHAGY GENE ATG5, NADPH OXIDASE, PEPTIDYLARGININE DEIMINASE-4, MITOCHONDRIAL-DNA, STREPTOCOCCUS-PNEUMONIAE, RHEUMATOID-ARTHRITIS, HISTONE DEIMINATION
journal title
CELL DEATH AND DIFFERENTIATION
Cell Death Differ.
volume
18
issue
4
pages
581 - 588
Web of Science type
Review
Web of Science id
000288314800002
JCR category
BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
8.849 (2011)
JCR rank
23/286 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
1350-9047
DOI
10.1038/cdd.2011.1
project
Ghent researchers on unfolded proteins in inflammatory disease (GROUP-ID)
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1197964
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1197964
date created
2011-03-28 14:04:43
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:44:30
@article{1197964,
  abstract     = {Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are chromatin structures loaded with antimicrobial molecules. They can trap and kill various bacterial, fungal and protozoal pathogens, and their release is one of the first lines of defense against pathogens. In vivo, NETs are released during a form of pathogen-induced cell death, which was recently named NETosis. Ex vivo, both dead and viable neutrophils can be stimulated to release NETs composed of either nuclear or mitochondrial chromatin, respectively. In certain pathological conditions, NETs are associated with severe tissue damage or certain auto-immune diseases. This review describes the recent progress made in the identification of the mechanisms involved in NETosis and discusses its interplay with autophagy and apoptosis.},
  author       = {Remijsen, Quinten and Kuijpers, TW and Wirawan, Ellen and Lippens, Saskia and Vandenabeele, Peter and Vanden Berghe, Tom},
  issn         = {1350-9047},
  journal      = {CELL DEATH AND DIFFERENTIATION},
  keyword      = {superoxide,autophagy,NETosis,NADPH oxidase,cell death,NEUTROPHIL EXTRACELLULAR TRAPS,CHRONIC GRANULOMATOUS-DISEASE,NF-KAPPA-B,AUTOPHAGY GENE ATG5,NADPH OXIDASE,PEPTIDYLARGININE DEIMINASE-4,MITOCHONDRIAL-DNA,STREPTOCOCCUS-PNEUMONIAE,RHEUMATOID-ARTHRITIS,HISTONE DEIMINATION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {581--588},
  title        = {Dying for a cause: NETosis, mechanisms behind an antimicrobial cell death modality},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/cdd.2011.1},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Remijsen, Quinten, TW Kuijpers, Ellen Wirawan, Saskia Lippens, Peter Vandenabeele, and Tom Vanden Berghe. 2011. “Dying for a Cause: NETosis, Mechanisms Behind an Antimicrobial Cell Death Modality.” Cell Death and Differentiation 18 (4): 581–588.
APA
Remijsen, Q., Kuijpers, T., Wirawan, E., Lippens, S., Vandenabeele, P., & Vanden Berghe, T. (2011). Dying for a cause: NETosis, mechanisms behind an antimicrobial cell death modality. CELL DEATH AND DIFFERENTIATION, 18(4), 581–588.
Vancouver
1.
Remijsen Q, Kuijpers T, Wirawan E, Lippens S, Vandenabeele P, Vanden Berghe T. Dying for a cause: NETosis, mechanisms behind an antimicrobial cell death modality. CELL DEATH AND DIFFERENTIATION. 2011;18(4):581–8.
MLA
Remijsen, Quinten, TW Kuijpers, Ellen Wirawan, et al. “Dying for a Cause: NETosis, Mechanisms Behind an Antimicrobial Cell Death Modality.” CELL DEATH AND DIFFERENTIATION 18.4 (2011): 581–588. Print.