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In vivo-derived horse blastocysts show transcriptional upregulation of developmentally important genes compared with in vitro-produced horse blastocysts

Katrien Smits UGent, Karen Goossens UGent, Ann Van Soom UGent, Jan Govaere UGent, Maarten Hoogewijs UGent and Luc Peelman UGent (2011) REPRODUCTION FERTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT. 23(2). p.364-375
abstract
In vitro-produced (IVP) equine blastocysts can give rise to successful pregnancies, but their morphology and developmental rate differ from those of in vivo-derived equine blastocysts. The aim of the present study was to evaluate this difference at the genetic level. Suppression subtractive hybridisation (SSH) was used to construct a cDNA library enriched for transcripts preferentially expressed in in vivo-derived equine blastocysts compared with IVP blastocysts. Of the 62 different genes identified in this way, six genes involved in embryonic development (BEX2, FABP3, HSP90AA1, MOBKL3, MCM7 and ODC) were selected to confirm this differential expression by reverse transcription-quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Using RT-qPCR, five genes were confirmed to be significantly upregulated in in vivo-derived blastocysts (i.e. FABP3, HSP90AA1 (both P<0.05), ODC, MOBKL3 and BEX2 (P<0.005 for all three)), confirming the results of the SSH. There was no significant difference in MCM7 expression between IVP and in vivo-derived blastocysts. In conclusion, five genes that are transcriptionally upregulated in in vivo-derived equine blastocysts compared with IVP blastocysts have been identified. Because of their possible importance in embryonic development, the expression of these genes can be used as a marker to evaluate in vitro embryo production systems in the horse.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
DNA-REPLICATION, EQUINE EMBRYOS, OOCYTE MATURATION, CULTURE-CONDITIONS, ORNITHINE-DECARBOXYLASE, BOVINE BLASTOCYSTS, MOUSE PREIMPLANTATION EMBRYOS, gene expression, MESSENGER-RNA EXPRESSION, CELL-SURVIVAL, PROTEINS
journal title
REPRODUCTION FERTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT
Reprod. Fertil. Dev.
volume
23
issue
2
pages
364 - 375
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000285879600011
JCR category
ZOOLOGY
JCR impact factor
2.109 (2011)
JCR rank
22/146 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
1031-3613
DOI
10.1071/RD10124
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1197648
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1197648
date created
2011-03-28 10:28:50
date last changed
2011-07-06 14:07:09
@article{1197648,
  abstract     = {In vitro-produced (IVP) equine blastocysts can give rise to successful pregnancies, but their morphology and developmental rate differ from those of in vivo-derived equine blastocysts. The aim of the present study was to evaluate this difference at the genetic level. Suppression subtractive hybridisation (SSH) was used to construct a cDNA library enriched for transcripts preferentially expressed in in vivo-derived equine blastocysts compared with IVP blastocysts. Of the 62 different genes identified in this way, six genes involved in embryonic development (BEX2, FABP3, HSP90AA1, MOBKL3, MCM7 and ODC) were selected to confirm this differential expression by reverse transcription-quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Using RT-qPCR, five genes were confirmed to be significantly upregulated in in vivo-derived blastocysts (i.e. FABP3, HSP90AA1 (both P{\textlangle}0.05), ODC, MOBKL3 and BEX2 (P{\textlangle}0.005 for all three)), confirming the results of the SSH. There was no significant difference in MCM7 expression between IVP and in vivo-derived blastocysts. In conclusion, five genes that are transcriptionally upregulated in in vivo-derived equine blastocysts compared with IVP blastocysts have been identified. Because of their possible importance in embryonic development, the expression of these genes can be used as a marker to evaluate in vitro embryo production systems in the horse.},
  author       = {Smits, Katrien and Goossens, Karen and Van Soom, Ann and Govaere, Jan and Hoogewijs, Maarten and Peelman, Luc},
  issn         = {1031-3613},
  journal      = {REPRODUCTION FERTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT},
  keyword      = {DNA-REPLICATION,EQUINE EMBRYOS,OOCYTE MATURATION,CULTURE-CONDITIONS,ORNITHINE-DECARBOXYLASE,BOVINE BLASTOCYSTS,MOUSE PREIMPLANTATION EMBRYOS,gene expression,MESSENGER-RNA EXPRESSION,CELL-SURVIVAL,PROTEINS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {364--375},
  title        = {In vivo-derived horse blastocysts show transcriptional upregulation of developmentally important genes compared with in vitro-produced horse blastocysts},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/RD10124},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Smits, Katrien, Karen Goossens, Ann Van Soom, Jan Govaere, Maarten Hoogewijs, and Luc Peelman. 2011. “In Vivo-derived Horse Blastocysts Show Transcriptional Upregulation of Developmentally Important Genes Compared with in Vitro-produced Horse Blastocysts.” Reproduction Fertility and Development 23 (2): 364–375.
APA
Smits, K., Goossens, K., Van Soom, A., Govaere, J., Hoogewijs, M., & Peelman, L. (2011). In vivo-derived horse blastocysts show transcriptional upregulation of developmentally important genes compared with in vitro-produced horse blastocysts. REPRODUCTION FERTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT, 23(2), 364–375.
Vancouver
1.
Smits K, Goossens K, Van Soom A, Govaere J, Hoogewijs M, Peelman L. In vivo-derived horse blastocysts show transcriptional upregulation of developmentally important genes compared with in vitro-produced horse blastocysts. REPRODUCTION FERTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT. 2011;23(2):364–75.
MLA
Smits, Katrien, Karen Goossens, Ann Van Soom, et al. “In Vivo-derived Horse Blastocysts Show Transcriptional Upregulation of Developmentally Important Genes Compared with in Vitro-produced Horse Blastocysts.” REPRODUCTION FERTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT 23.2 (2011): 364–375. Print.