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The experience of daily hassles, cardiovascular reactivity and adolescent risk taking and self esteem

Hans Vermeersch UGent, Guy T'Sjoen UGent, Jean Kaufman UGent, Johny Vincke UGent and Piet Bracke UGent (2010) SOCIAL FORCES. 89(1). p.63-88
abstract
Based on Boyce and Ellis' model on context and biological sensitivity to the context, this article analyzes the interaction between the experience of daily hassles and experimentally induced cardiovascular reactivity as an indicator of stress reactivity in explaining risk taking and self-esteem This study found, in a sample of 599 adolescents, that (1 daily hassles were more strongly related to risk taking in boys and girls with high vs low levels of cardiovascular reactivity and (2 taking Into account the gendered experience of daily hassles was important in predicting outcomes for stress-reactive boys and girls These results indicate that a biosocial approach may result in an increased understanding of the variability in the outcomes of stressors
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
PHYSIOLOGICAL REACTIVITY, GENERAL STRAIN THEORY, SOCIOECONOMIC-STATUS, STRESS REACTIVITY, BLOOD-PRESSURE, SEX-DIFFERENCES, LIFE-STRESS, BEHAVIOR, GENDER, DELINQUENCY
journal title
SOCIAL FORCES
Soc. Forces
volume
89
issue
1
pages
63 - 88
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000284919700003
JCR category
SOCIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
1.343 (2010)
JCR rank
27/129 (2010)
JCR quartile
1 (2010)
ISSN
0037-7732
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1194321
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1194321
date created
2011-03-22 14:27:24
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:45:14
@article{1194321,
  abstract     = {Based on Boyce and Ellis' model on context and biological sensitivity to the context, this article analyzes the interaction between the experience of daily hassles and experimentally induced cardiovascular reactivity as an indicator of stress reactivity in explaining risk taking and self-esteem This study found, in a sample of 599 adolescents, that (1 daily hassles were more strongly related to risk taking in boys and girls with high vs low levels of cardiovascular reactivity and (2 taking Into account the gendered experience of daily hassles was important in predicting outcomes for stress-reactive boys and girls These results indicate that a biosocial approach may result in an increased understanding of the variability in the outcomes of stressors},
  author       = {Vermeersch, Hans and T'Sjoen, Guy and Kaufman, Jean and Vincke, Johny and Bracke, Piet},
  issn         = {0037-7732},
  journal      = {SOCIAL FORCES},
  keyword      = {PHYSIOLOGICAL REACTIVITY,GENERAL STRAIN THEORY,SOCIOECONOMIC-STATUS,STRESS REACTIVITY,BLOOD-PRESSURE,SEX-DIFFERENCES,LIFE-STRESS,BEHAVIOR,GENDER,DELINQUENCY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {63--88},
  title        = {The experience of daily hassles, cardiovascular reactivity and adolescent risk taking and self esteem},
  volume       = {89},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Vermeersch, Hans, Guy T’Sjoen, Jean Kaufman, Johny Vincke, and Piet Bracke. 2010. “The Experience of Daily Hassles, Cardiovascular Reactivity and Adolescent Risk Taking and Self Esteem.” Social Forces 89 (1): 63–88.
APA
Vermeersch, Hans, T’Sjoen, G., Kaufman, J., Vincke, J., & Bracke, P. (2010). The experience of daily hassles, cardiovascular reactivity and adolescent risk taking and self esteem. SOCIAL FORCES, 89(1), 63–88.
Vancouver
1.
Vermeersch H, T’Sjoen G, Kaufman J, Vincke J, Bracke P. The experience of daily hassles, cardiovascular reactivity and adolescent risk taking and self esteem. SOCIAL FORCES. 2010;89(1):63–88.
MLA
Vermeersch, Hans, Guy T’Sjoen, Jean Kaufman, et al. “The Experience of Daily Hassles, Cardiovascular Reactivity and Adolescent Risk Taking and Self Esteem.” SOCIAL FORCES 89.1 (2010): 63–88. Print.