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Lysimeter application for measuring the water and solute fluxes with high precision

R Meissner, MNV Prasad, Gijs Du Laing UGent and J Rinklebe (2010) CURRENT SCIENCE. 99(5). p.601-607
abstract
Different methods exist for measuring water and solute flux in and below the root zone. Besides indirect methods (e. g. water balance, tensiometer, time domain reflectometry, frequency domain reflectometry and environmental tracer), direct methods (e. g. drainage-type lysimeter, water flux meter) have a long tradition and have been successfully used in seepage research. However, lysimeters are most reliable and accurate for in situ water and solute assessment. A large weighable outdoor lysimeter is the best method for obtaining reliable data about seepage water quantity and quality, but it involves significant investment and additional expenses for maintenance. To tackle this problem new methods for the vertical collection of large volume soil monoliths and for the placement of the lysimeter in a container lysimeter unit have been developed. The design of lysimeters typically used in Europe - a weighable gravitation lysimeter and a weighable groundwater lysimeter are explained. An example is given for the high precision of the new lysimeter weighing technique. Besides recording rainfall and seepage, its weighing precision makes it possible to register mass input by dew, fog or rime. It also permits accurate calculation of actual evapotranspiration. The newly developed lysimeter types will be an essential tool for scaling up results obtained in small-scale experiments to larger geographical units. Furthermore, the newly developed experimental set-up allows a scenario simulation of topical climatic and hydrologic questions, e. g. global warming and its impact on the water and solute balance, the influence of dew and fog on the establishment of a vegetation cover in arid areas or the transport of contaminants during heavy rainfall following a severe drying-up of the soil profile.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
PRECIPITATION
journal title
CURRENT SCIENCE
Curr. Sci.
volume
99
issue
5
pages
601 - 607
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000282445000022
JCR category
MULTIDISCIPLINARY SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
0.897 (2010)
JCR rank
21/56 (2010)
JCR quartile
2 (2010)
ISSN
0011-3891
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1193467
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1193467
date created
2011-03-22 09:12:46
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:45:14
@article{1193467,
  abstract     = {Different methods exist for measuring water and solute flux in and below the root zone. Besides indirect methods (e. g. water balance, tensiometer, time domain reflectometry, frequency domain reflectometry and environmental tracer), direct methods (e. g. drainage-type lysimeter, water flux meter) have a long tradition and have been successfully used in seepage research. However, lysimeters are most reliable and accurate for in situ water and solute assessment. A large weighable outdoor lysimeter is the best method for obtaining reliable data about seepage water quantity and quality, but it involves significant investment and additional expenses for maintenance. To tackle this problem new methods for the vertical collection of large volume soil monoliths and for the placement of the lysimeter in a container lysimeter unit have been developed. The design of lysimeters typically used in Europe - a weighable gravitation lysimeter and a weighable groundwater lysimeter are explained. An example is given for the high precision of the new lysimeter weighing technique. Besides recording rainfall and seepage, its weighing precision makes it possible to register mass input by dew, fog or rime. It also permits accurate calculation of actual evapotranspiration. The newly developed lysimeter types will be an essential tool for scaling up results obtained in small-scale experiments to larger geographical units. Furthermore, the newly developed experimental set-up allows a scenario simulation of topical climatic and hydrologic questions, e. g. global warming and its impact on the water and solute balance, the influence of dew and fog on the establishment of a vegetation cover in arid areas or the transport of contaminants during heavy rainfall following a severe drying-up of the soil profile.},
  author       = {Meissner, R and Prasad, MNV and Du Laing, Gijs and Rinklebe, J},
  issn         = {0011-3891},
  journal      = {CURRENT SCIENCE},
  keyword      = {PRECIPITATION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {601--607},
  title        = {Lysimeter application for measuring the water and solute fluxes with high precision},
  volume       = {99},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Meissner, R, MNV Prasad, Gijs Du Laing, and J Rinklebe. 2010. “Lysimeter Application for Measuring the Water and Solute Fluxes with High Precision.” Current Science 99 (5): 601–607.
APA
Meissner, R., Prasad, M., Du Laing, G., & Rinklebe, J. (2010). Lysimeter application for measuring the water and solute fluxes with high precision. CURRENT SCIENCE, 99(5), 601–607.
Vancouver
1.
Meissner R, Prasad M, Du Laing G, Rinklebe J. Lysimeter application for measuring the water and solute fluxes with high precision. CURRENT SCIENCE. 2010;99(5):601–7.
MLA
Meissner, R, MNV Prasad, Gijs Du Laing, et al. “Lysimeter Application for Measuring the Water and Solute Fluxes with High Precision.” CURRENT SCIENCE 99.5 (2010): 601–607. Print.