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Influence of vegetable inclusion in rice monoculture on soil organic matter quality under sub-tropical climate

(2012) Acta Horticulturae. p.211-217
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Abstract
Soil organic matter (SOM) quality and iits decomposibility is influenced by cropping pattern. However, little is known on this matter, particularly so far rice monoculture or comination of vegetables with rice culture. Therefore, four pairs of fields having vegetable-rice and rice-rice cropping pattern were selected from four different locations in Bangladesh, covering floodplain and terrace soils. Soils were first physically fractionated into particulate organic matter (POM) and silt and clay sized OM. The silt and clay sized OM was further chemically fractionated by oxidation with 6% NaOCl to isolate an oxidation-resistant OM fraction, followed by extraction of mineral bound OM with 10% HF (HF-res OM). The results show that there is a small increase in POM in vegetable compared with rice soils. Among the chemical treatments, NaOCl oxidized the largest amount of OC and N from the silt and clay fractions of vegetable soils. The silt and clay N in vegetable soil was found to be more susceptible to NaOCl treatment compared with OC. Both the HF-extracted (HF-ex) and HF-res OM fractions were found to be lower in vegetable soils compared with rice soils. Results from both physical and chemical fraction of SOM suggest that SOM accumulated in vegetable-rice cropping pattern are more labile than the solely rice based cropping pattern and prone to decompose quickly in any change of land use.
Keywords
soil organic matter quality, MANAGEMENT, physical fractionation, cropping pattern, vegetable soil, FRACTIONS, rice monoculture, sub-tropical soil

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Chicago
Kader, MD Abdul, Steven Sleutel, Shamim Ara Begum, and Stefaan De Neve. 2012. “Influence of Vegetable Inclusion in Rice Monoculture on Soil Organic Matter Quality Under Sub-tropical Climate.” In Acta Horticulturae, ed. Stefaan De Neve, M Boehme, A Everaarts, and J Neeteson, 211–217. Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS).
APA
Kader, M. A., Sleutel, S., Begum, S. A., & De Neve, S. (2012). Influence of vegetable inclusion in rice monoculture on soil organic matter quality under sub-tropical climate. In Stefaan De Neve, M. Boehme, A. Everaarts, & J. Neeteson (Eds.), Acta Horticulturae (pp. 211–217). Presented at the 1st International symposium on Sustainable Vegetable Production in Southeast Asia, Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS).
Vancouver
1.
Kader MA, Sleutel S, Begum SA, De Neve S. Influence of vegetable inclusion in rice monoculture on soil organic matter quality under sub-tropical climate. In: De Neve S, Boehme M, Everaarts A, Neeteson J, editors. Acta Horticulturae. Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS); 2012. p. 211–7.
MLA
Kader, MD Abdul, Steven Sleutel, Shamim Ara Begum, et al. “Influence of Vegetable Inclusion in Rice Monoculture on Soil Organic Matter Quality Under Sub-tropical Climate.” Acta Horticulturae. Ed. Stefaan De Neve et al. Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS), 2012. 211–217. Print.
@inproceedings{1191828,
  abstract     = {Soil organic matter (SOM) quality and iits decomposibility is influenced by cropping pattern. However, little is known on this matter, particularly so far rice monoculture or comination of vegetables with rice culture. Therefore, four pairs of fields having vegetable-rice and rice-rice cropping pattern were selected from four different locations in Bangladesh, covering floodplain and terrace soils. Soils were first physically fractionated into particulate organic matter (POM) and silt and clay sized OM. The silt and clay sized OM was further chemically fractionated by oxidation with 6\% NaOCl to isolate an oxidation-resistant OM fraction, followed by extraction of mineral bound OM with 10\% HF (HF-res OM). The results show that there is a small increase in POM in vegetable compared with rice soils. Among the chemical treatments, NaOCl oxidized the largest amount of OC and N from the silt and clay fractions of vegetable soils. The silt and clay N in vegetable soil was found to be more susceptible to NaOCl treatment compared with OC. Both the HF-extracted (HF-ex) and HF-res OM fractions were found to be lower in vegetable soils compared with rice soils. Results from both physical and chemical fraction of SOM suggest that SOM accumulated in vegetable-rice cropping pattern are more labile than the solely rice based cropping pattern and prone to decompose quickly in any change of land use.},
  author       = {Kader, MD Abdul and Sleutel, Steven and Begum, Shamim Ara and De Neve, Stefaan},
  booktitle    = {Acta Horticulturae},
  editor       = {De Neve, Stefaan and Boehme, M and Everaarts, A and Neeteson, J},
  isbn         = {9789066055353},
  issn         = {0567-7572},
  keyword      = {soil organic matter quality,MANAGEMENT,physical fractionation,cropping pattern,vegetable soil,FRACTIONS,rice monoculture,sub-tropical soil},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Salatiga, Indonesia},
  pages        = {211--217},
  publisher    = {International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS)},
  title        = {Influence of vegetable inclusion in rice monoculture on soil organic matter quality under sub-tropical climate},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2012.958.25},
  year         = {2012},
}

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