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Phthalate levels in food on the Belgian market

(2010) ARCHIVES OF PUBLIC HEALTH. 68(Suppl. 678). p.S83-S83
Author
Organization
Abstract
Phthalates are widely used as plasticisers in flexible and weak polymer products. Human exposure occurs mainly via food ingestion and can cause a wide range of health and reproductive effects. Phthalates can enter the food chain via environmental contamination or migration from contact materials into food. Our aim is to determine the concentration of phthalates in food on the Belgian market and to explore the various contamination pathways. For this purpose, a measurement campaign of phthalates in food has been set up. Four hundred samples of widely consumed foods were purchased in Belgian shops. Brand name, packaging material and properties, shelf life, time and place of purchase, picture and product specific properties (e.g. pH, preserving agent, fat content) were stored in a database. This database was used to explore the contamination pathways by identifying relations between measured concentrations and product Properties. Eight phthalates were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with electron impact ionisation. Phthalates are lipophilic, so they tend to concentrate in high-fat food products like butter, margarine, oil and cheese. Concentrations can vary from only a few to hundreds μg/kg food product. Contamination occurs from various sources such as migration from packaging material (including printing inks and glues), contact with plastics during food production and preparation, and transfer via the environment. Analysis of food samples on the Belgian market shows a wide variety of phthalate concentrations. Combining these results with information on product and packaging properties gives first insights in possible contamination routes.
Keywords
Food Analysis, Food Packaging, Food Contamination, phthalate, Belgium

Citation

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Chicago
Van Holderbeke, Mirja, Kelly Servaes, Lieve Geerts, Guido Vanermen, Tine Fierens, and Isabelle Sioen. 2010. “Phthalate Levels in Food on the Belgian Market.” In Archives of Public Health, 68:S83–S83. Belgisch Archief van Sociale Geneeskunde vzw.
APA
Van Holderbeke, M., Servaes, K., Geerts, L., Vanermen, G., Fierens, T., & Sioen, I. (2010). Phthalate levels in food on the Belgian market. ARCHIVES OF PUBLIC HEALTH (Vol. 68, pp. S83–S83). Presented at the 2010 Annual congress of the Belgian Nutrition Society : Lipids in nutrition, Belgisch Archief van Sociale Geneeskunde vzw.
Vancouver
1.
Van Holderbeke M, Servaes K, Geerts L, Vanermen G, Fierens T, Sioen I. Phthalate levels in food on the Belgian market. ARCHIVES OF PUBLIC HEALTH. Belgisch Archief van Sociale Geneeskunde vzw; 2010. p. S83–S83.
MLA
Van Holderbeke, Mirja, Kelly Servaes, Lieve Geerts, et al. “Phthalate Levels in Food on the Belgian Market.” Archives of Public Health. Vol. 68. Belgisch Archief van Sociale Geneeskunde vzw, 2010. S83–S83. Print.
@inproceedings{1189406,
  abstract     = {Phthalates are widely used as plasticisers in flexible and weak polymer products. Human exposure occurs mainly via food ingestion and can cause a wide range of health and reproductive effects. Phthalates can enter the food chain via environmental contamination or migration from contact materials into food. Our aim is to determine the concentration of phthalates in food on the Belgian market and to explore the various contamination pathways. For this purpose, a measurement campaign of phthalates in food has been set up. Four hundred samples of widely consumed foods were purchased in Belgian shops. Brand name, packaging material and properties, shelf life, time and place of purchase, picture and product specific properties (e.g. pH, preserving agent, fat content) were stored in a database. This database was used to explore the contamination pathways by identifying relations between measured concentrations and product Properties. Eight phthalates were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with electron impact ionisation. Phthalates are lipophilic, so they tend to concentrate in high-fat food products like butter, margarine, oil and cheese. Concentrations can vary from only a few to hundreds μg/kg food product. Contamination occurs from various sources such as migration from packaging material (including printing inks and glues), contact with plastics during food production and preparation, and transfer via the environment. Analysis of food samples on the Belgian market shows a wide variety of phthalate concentrations. Combining these results with information on product and packaging properties gives first insights in possible contamination routes.},
  author       = {Van Holderbeke, Mirja and Servaes, Kelly and Geerts, Lieve and Vanermen, Guido and Fierens, Tine and Sioen, Isabelle},
  booktitle    = {ARCHIVES OF PUBLIC HEALTH},
  issn         = {0778-7367},
  keywords     = {Food Analysis,Food Packaging,Food Contamination,phthalate,Belgium},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Brussels, Belgium},
  number       = {Suppl. 678},
  pages        = {S83--S83},
  publisher    = {Belgisch Archief van Sociale Geneeskunde vzw},
  title        = {Phthalate levels in food on the Belgian market},
  volume       = {68},
  year         = {2010},
}