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Habitat preferences of European nightjars caprimulgus europaeus in forests on sandy soils

Gorik Verstraeten UGent, Lander Baeten UGent and Kris Verheyen UGent (2011) BIRD STUDY. 58(2). p.120-129
abstract
Capsule Nightjars prefer open places in younger forest areas, and open stands with wide forest tracks in older forest areas. Aims European Nightjars are a Species of European Conservation Concern (historical declines in both population and range). The reduction of heathland habitats means that forested areas are an increasingly important habitat for Nightjars. However, the ecology of Nightjars in forested areas is poorly understood. We set out to investigate Nightjar habitat preferences in a 5000-ha forest landscape in northern Belgium. Methods Calling ‘churring’ males were counted in each year over ten years. Habitat descriptors were derived from detailed habitat mapping based on aerial photographs and extensive field surveys. The different habitat descriptors were compared between patches occupied by Nightjars and control patches (patches selected at random in the study area). Results As expected, Nightjars showed a preference for open places in younger forest areas (clearfelled areas, young stands, windfall and permanent open places). They also showed a preference for old and open stands that had wide forest tracks. Forest type appeared not to be significant. Heath, bare sand and, to a lesser extent, leaf litter have an increased presence in patches used by Nightjars. Conclusion For the conservation of Nightjars, we suggest that open places within larger forests should be created. Also a network of wide forest tracks can make smaller patches suitable for Nightjars. Patches of bare sand should be created or maintained.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
BELGIUM, MANAGEMENT, POPULATION, species conservation, HEATHLANDS, heath, habitat preference, forest conversion, Caprimulgus europaeus, BRITAIN, ENGLAND, DORSET, PLANT
journal title
BIRD STUDY
Bird study
volume
58
issue
2
pages
120 - 129
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000289568500002
JCR category
ORNITHOLOGY
JCR impact factor
0.868 (2011)
JCR rank
10/20 (2011)
JCR quartile
3 (2011)
ISSN
0006-3657
DOI
10.1080/00063657.2010.547562
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1188640
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1188640
date created
2011-03-15 11:50:33
date last changed
2011-05-06 13:01:15
@article{1188640,
  abstract     = {Capsule Nightjars prefer open places in younger forest areas, and open stands with wide forest tracks in older forest areas.
Aims European Nightjars are a Species of European Conservation Concern (historical declines in both population and range). The reduction of heathland habitats means that forested areas are an increasingly important habitat for Nightjars. However, the ecology of Nightjars in forested areas is poorly understood. We set out to investigate Nightjar habitat preferences in a 5000-ha forest landscape in northern
Belgium.
Methods Calling {\textquoteleft}churring{\textquoteright} males were counted in each year over ten years. Habitat descriptors were derived from detailed habitat mapping based on aerial photographs and extensive field surveys. The different habitat descriptors were compared between patches occupied by Nightjars and control patches
(patches selected at random in the study area).
Results As expected, Nightjars showed a preference for open places in younger forest areas (clearfelled areas, young stands, windfall and permanent open places). They also showed a preference for old and open stands that had wide forest tracks. Forest type appeared not to be significant. Heath, bare sand and, to a lesser extent, leaf litter have an increased presence in patches used by Nightjars.
Conclusion For the conservation of Nightjars, we suggest that open places within larger forests should be created. Also a network of wide forest tracks can make smaller patches suitable for Nightjars. Patches of bare sand should be created or maintained.},
  author       = {Verstraeten, Gorik and Baeten, Lander and Verheyen, Kris},
  issn         = {0006-3657},
  journal      = {BIRD STUDY},
  keyword      = {BELGIUM,MANAGEMENT,POPULATION,species conservation,HEATHLANDS,heath,habitat preference,forest conversion,Caprimulgus europaeus,BRITAIN,ENGLAND,DORSET,PLANT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {120--129},
  title        = {Habitat preferences of European nightjars caprimulgus europaeus in forests on sandy soils},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00063657.2010.547562},
  volume       = {58},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Verstraeten, Gorik, Lander Baeten, and Kris Verheyen. 2011. “Habitat Preferences of European Nightjars Caprimulgus Europaeus in Forests on Sandy Soils.” Bird Study 58 (2): 120–129.
APA
Verstraeten, Gorik, Baeten, L., & Verheyen, K. (2011). Habitat preferences of European nightjars caprimulgus europaeus in forests on sandy soils. BIRD STUDY, 58(2), 120–129.
Vancouver
1.
Verstraeten G, Baeten L, Verheyen K. Habitat preferences of European nightjars caprimulgus europaeus in forests on sandy soils. BIRD STUDY. 2011;58(2):120–9.
MLA
Verstraeten, Gorik, Lander Baeten, and Kris Verheyen. “Habitat Preferences of European Nightjars Caprimulgus Europaeus in Forests on Sandy Soils.” BIRD STUDY 58.2 (2011): 120–129. Print.