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Blur the boundaries! Policing in contemporary peace operations

Jelle Janssens (UGent)
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Abstract
The provision of public security has generally been recognized as a key element in peace and related stability operations. The problem facing the international community (IC), however, is who is to be made responsible for that security during the transition towards a peaceful and stable society. When no effective or acceptable local security arrangements are in place (as was the case in, for example, Kosovo, Timor-Leste, Afghanistan and Iraq), the IC will be called upon to provide public security. In contemporary operations, numerous actors (such as the international civilian police, gendarmerie forces, private security companies, custom agents and the military) are involved in the provision of that security. Whereas each more or less has a well-defined role in their home countries, they are now summoned to be as flexible as possible. This flexibility is needed because contemporary peace operations address a broad range of security areas (such as border, police, defence, intelligence, prison and justice reform), but lack the sufficient number of qualified personnel to do it. This contribution is dedicated to the blurring of boundaries between security providers in these operations. It does not address, however, the nature of the blurred boundaries, but it answers the question why the boundaries are blurring. In other words, it pays attention towards the underlying rationalities. These rationalities are traced back to policy decisions, assumptions and ideological dogmas and to more pragmatic solutions to personnel shortages.
Keywords
security sector reform, private security companies, formed police units, blurring boundaries, civpol, gendarmerie

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Chicago
Janssens, Jelle. 2010. “Blur the Boundaries! Policing in Contemporary Peace Operations.” In Blurring Military and Police Roles, ed. Marleen Easton, Monica den Boer, Jelle Janssens, René Moelker, and Tom Vander Beken, 79–110. The Hague, The Netherlands: Eleven International Publishing.
APA
Janssens, Jelle. (2010). Blur the boundaries! Policing in contemporary peace operations. In M. Easton, M. den Boer, J. Janssens, R. Moelker, & T. Vander Beken (Eds.), Blurring military and police roles (pp. 79–110). The Hague, The Netherlands: Eleven International Publishing.
Vancouver
1.
Janssens J. Blur the boundaries! Policing in contemporary peace operations. In: Easton M, den Boer M, Janssens J, Moelker R, Vander Beken T, editors. Blurring military and police roles. The Hague, The Netherlands: Eleven International Publishing; 2010. p. 79–110.
MLA
Janssens, Jelle. “Blur the Boundaries! Policing in Contemporary Peace Operations.” Blurring Military and Police Roles. Ed. Marleen Easton et al. The Hague, The Netherlands: Eleven International Publishing, 2010. 79–110. Print.
@incollection{1182250,
  abstract     = {The provision of public security has generally been recognized as a key element in peace and related stability  operations. The problem facing the international community (IC), however, is who is to be made responsible for that security during the transition towards a peaceful and stable society. When no effective or acceptable local security arrangements are in place (as was the case in, for example, Kosovo, Timor-Leste, Afghanistan and Iraq), the IC will be called upon to provide public security. In contemporary operations, numerous actors (such as the international civilian police, gendarmerie forces, private security companies, custom agents  and the military) are involved in the provision of that security. Whereas each more or less has a well-defined role in their home countries, they are now summoned to be as flexible as possible. This flexibility is needed because contemporary peace operations address a broad range of security areas (such as border, police, defence, intelligence, prison and justice reform), but lack the sufficient number of qualified personnel to do it. This contribution is dedicated to the blurring of boundaries between security providers in these operations. It does not address, however,  the nature of the blurred boundaries, but it answers the question why the boundaries are blurring. In other words, it pays attention towards the underlying rationalities. These rationalities are traced back to policy decisions, assumptions and ideological dogmas and to more pragmatic solutions to personnel shortages.},
  author       = {Janssens, Jelle},
  booktitle    = {Blurring military and police roles},
  editor       = {Easton, Marleen and den Boer, Monica and Janssens, Jelle and Moelker, Ren{\'e}  and Vander Beken, Tom},
  isbn         = {9789089743091},
  keyword      = {security sector reform,private security companies,formed police units,blurring boundaries,civpol,gendarmerie},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {79--110},
  publisher    = {Eleven International Publishing},
  title        = {Blur the boundaries! Policing in contemporary peace operations},
  year         = {2010},
}