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How do speakers resist distraction? Evidence from a taboo picture-word interference task

Elisah D'Hooge and Robert Hartsuiker UGent (2011) PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE. 22(7). p.855-859
abstract
Even in the presence of irrelevant stimuli, word production is a highly accurate and fluent process. But how do speakers prevent themselves from naming the wrong things? One possibility is that an attentional system inhibits task-irrelevant representations. Alternatively, a verbal self-monitoring system might check speech for accuracy and remove errors stemming from irrelevant information. Because self-monitoring is sensitive to social appropriateness, taboo errors should be intercepted more than neutral errors are. To prevent embarrassment, speakers might also speak more slowly when confronted with taboo distractors. Our results from two experiments are consistent with the self-monitoring account: Examining picture-naming speed (Experiment 1) and accuracy (Experiment 2), we found fewer naming errors but longer picture-naming latencies for pictures presented with taboo distractors than for pictures presented with neutral distractors. These results suggest that when intrusions of irrelevant words are highly undesirable, speakers do not simply inhibit these words: Rather, the language-production system adjusts itself to the context and filters out the undesirable words.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
SEMANTIC INTERFERENCE, SPEECH PRODUCTION, RESPONSE EXCLUSION, LEXICAL ACCESS, TIME COURSE, STROOP, FACILITATION, FREQUENCY, SELECTION, PARADIGM, picture-word interference, taboo words, distracting stimuli
journal title
PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE
Psychol. sci.
volume
22
issue
7
pages
855 - 859
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000294709300003
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY, MULTIDISCIPLINARY
JCR impact factor
4.431 (2011)
JCR rank
9/123 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
0956-7976
DOI
10.1177/0956797611410984
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1182089
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1182089
date created
2011-03-04 10:25:59
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:46:37
@article{1182089,
  abstract     = {Even in the presence of irrelevant stimuli, word production is a highly accurate and fluent process. But how do speakers prevent themselves from naming the wrong things? One possibility is that an attentional system inhibits task-irrelevant representations. Alternatively, a verbal self-monitoring system might check speech for accuracy and remove errors stemming from irrelevant information. Because self-monitoring is sensitive to social appropriateness, taboo errors should be intercepted more than neutral errors are. To prevent embarrassment, speakers might also speak more slowly when confronted with taboo distractors. Our results from two experiments are consistent with the self-monitoring account: Examining picture-naming speed (Experiment 1) and accuracy (Experiment 2), we found fewer naming errors but longer picture-naming latencies for pictures presented with taboo distractors than for pictures presented with neutral distractors. These results suggest that when intrusions of irrelevant words are highly undesirable, speakers do not simply inhibit these words: Rather, the language-production system adjusts itself to the context and filters out the undesirable words.},
  author       = {D'Hooge, Elisah and Hartsuiker, Robert},
  issn         = {0956-7976},
  journal      = {PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE},
  keyword      = {SEMANTIC INTERFERENCE,SPEECH PRODUCTION,RESPONSE EXCLUSION,LEXICAL ACCESS,TIME COURSE,STROOP,FACILITATION,FREQUENCY,SELECTION,PARADIGM,picture-word interference,taboo words,distracting stimuli},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {855--859},
  title        = {How do speakers resist distraction? Evidence from a taboo picture-word interference task},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0956797611410984},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
D’Hooge, Elisah, and Robert Hartsuiker. 2011. “How Do Speakers Resist Distraction? Evidence from a Taboo Picture-word Interference Task.” Psychological Science 22 (7): 855–859.
APA
D’Hooge, E., & Hartsuiker, R. (2011). How do speakers resist distraction? Evidence from a taboo picture-word interference task. PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE, 22(7), 855–859.
Vancouver
1.
D’Hooge E, Hartsuiker R. How do speakers resist distraction? Evidence from a taboo picture-word interference task. PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE. 2011;22(7):855–9.
MLA
D’Hooge, Elisah, and Robert Hartsuiker. “How Do Speakers Resist Distraction? Evidence from a Taboo Picture-word Interference Task.” PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE 22.7 (2011): 855–859. Print.