Advanced search
1 file | 1.02 MB

Influence of milk fatty acid composition and process parameters on the quality of ice cream

(2010) DAIRY SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY. 90(4). p.431-447
Author
Organization
Abstract
There has been considerable interest in recent years in altering the fatty acid composition of milk fat in dairy products to improve the long-term health of consumers. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of altering the fatty acid composition and varying two process parameters (homogenization pressure and ageing temperature) on the quality of ice cream. The quality of ice cream (8% fat) was monitored before and after heat shock by assessing fat droplet size, solvent extractable fat content, texture analysis, meltdown tests and sensory analyses. The results suggest that a high solid fat content and low homogenization pressure correlated well with large particles and high amounts of solvent extractable fat, which resulted in firm ice cream with slow melting behaviour and good structure retention. In contrast, ageing temperature did not significantly influence fat destabilization. Following heat shock, the results suggested that the hardness of ice cream was not determined by any of the parameters investigated, but was probably dominated by the amount of ice crystals. A good melting behaviour was retained after heat shock, provided that a strong matrix of destabilized fat was produced during the freezing process. Even though differences could be observed in hardness and melting behaviour for different milk fats or process conditions, these differences were hardly identified by trained sensory panels. These results suggest that high-quality ice cream can be produced with an altered fatty acid composition without any alteration in the conventional production process, provided that ice cream is stored and consumed under ideal circumstances.
Keywords
ice cream, GLOBULES, ageing temperature, homogenization, HARDNESS, DESTABILIZATION, fatty acid composition, EMULSIONS

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 1.02 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
De Smet, Karen, Jan De Block, Paul Van Der Meeren, Katleen Raes, Koen Dewettinck, and Katleen Coudijzer. 2010. “Influence of Milk Fatty Acid Composition and Process Parameters on the Quality of Ice Cream.” Dairy Science & Technology 90 (4): 431–447.
APA
De Smet, Karen, De Block, J., Van Der Meeren, P., Raes, K., Dewettinck, K., & Coudijzer, K. (2010). Influence of milk fatty acid composition and process parameters on the quality of ice cream. DAIRY SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 90(4), 431–447.
Vancouver
1.
De Smet K, De Block J, Van Der Meeren P, Raes K, Dewettinck K, Coudijzer K. Influence of milk fatty acid composition and process parameters on the quality of ice cream. DAIRY SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY. 2010;90(4):431–47.
MLA
De Smet, Karen, Jan De Block, Paul Van Der Meeren, et al. “Influence of Milk Fatty Acid Composition and Process Parameters on the Quality of Ice Cream.” DAIRY SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY 90.4 (2010): 431–447. Print.
@article{1178901,
  abstract     = {There has been considerable interest in recent years in altering the fatty acid composition of milk fat in dairy products to improve the long-term health of consumers. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of altering the fatty acid composition and varying two process parameters (homogenization pressure and ageing temperature) on the quality of ice cream. The quality of ice cream (8\% fat) was monitored before and after heat shock by assessing fat droplet size, solvent extractable fat content, texture analysis, meltdown tests and sensory analyses. The results suggest that a high solid fat content and low homogenization pressure correlated well with large particles and high amounts of solvent extractable fat, which resulted in firm ice cream with slow melting behaviour and good structure retention. In contrast, ageing temperature did not significantly influence fat destabilization. Following heat shock, the results suggested that the hardness of ice cream was not determined by any of the parameters investigated, but was probably dominated by the amount of ice crystals. A good melting behaviour was retained after heat shock, provided that a strong matrix of destabilized fat was produced during the freezing process. Even though differences could be observed in hardness and melting behaviour for different milk fats or process conditions, these differences were hardly identified by trained sensory panels. These results suggest that high-quality ice cream can be produced with an altered fatty acid composition without any alteration in the conventional production process, provided that ice cream is stored and consumed under ideal circumstances.},
  author       = {De Smet, Karen and De Block, Jan and Van Der Meeren, Paul and Raes, Katleen and Dewettinck, Koen and Coudijzer, Katleen},
  issn         = {1958-5586},
  journal      = {DAIRY SCIENCE \& TECHNOLOGY},
  keyword      = {ice cream,GLOBULES,ageing temperature,homogenization,HARDNESS,DESTABILIZATION,fatty acid composition,EMULSIONS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {431--447},
  title        = {Influence of milk fatty acid composition and process parameters on the quality of ice cream},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/dst/2010006},
  volume       = {90},
  year         = {2010},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: