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Eten en gegeten worden in het Schelde-estuarium

(2001) DE LEVENDE NATUUR. 102(2). p.52-55
Author
Organization
Abstract
Like other estuaries, the Schelde estuary is characterized by a diversity of organic matter inputs. These inputs can be classified as ‘autochtonous’, i.e. produced in situ (e.g. phytoplankton and microphytobenthos), or ‘allochtonous’, i.e. transported into the estuary via river and seawater inflow. Together, these organic matter sources form an enormous energy pool, that is utilized by huge numbers of living organisms. The Schelde is a largely heterotrophic estuary, implying that allochtonous sources fuel the majority of the metabolic processes taking place within the system. This is most pronounced in the upstream reaches of the estuary, and is strikingly illustrated in the maximum turbidity zone. All this allochtonous carbon fuels a decomposer food web where bacteria, their protistan grazers, and rotifera and copepods feeding on protists form the link between detritus and the higher trophic levels like shrimps, fish and birds. The high bacterial activity results in oxygen depletion, which in turn causes a relatively species-poor food web. Downstream, the relative importance of autochtonous carbon increases, and an autotrophic, grazer food web develops in addition to the decomposer food web. In the water column, phytoplankton is grazed by copepods, which in turn are food for fish and shrimps. In the benthos, a large variety of algal grazers and detritus feeders exist, forming the basis of complex, interlinked food webs. Inspite of the high concentrations of available carbon and nutrients, much of the consumed sources are constantly being recycled within and between different trophic levels. Unraveling these food webs is often a complex task requiring sophisticated methods such as stable isotope tracer techniques.
Keywords
estuarium, plankton, voedselweb, benthos, Schelde

Citation

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Chicago
Moens, Tom, Peter Herman, and Tom Ysebaert. 2001. “Eten En Gegeten Worden in Het Schelde-estuarium.” De Levende Natuur 102 (2): 52–55.
APA
Moens, T., Herman, P., & Ysebaert, T. (2001). Eten en gegeten worden in het Schelde-estuarium. DE LEVENDE NATUUR, 102(2), 52–55.
Vancouver
1.
Moens T, Herman P, Ysebaert T. Eten en gegeten worden in het Schelde-estuarium. DE LEVENDE NATUUR. 2001;102(2):52–5.
MLA
Moens, Tom, Peter Herman, and Tom Ysebaert. “Eten En Gegeten Worden in Het Schelde-estuarium.” DE LEVENDE NATUUR 102.2 (2001): 52–55. Print.
@article{1176730,
  abstract     = {Like other estuaries, the Schelde estuary is characterized by a diversity of organic matter inputs. These inputs can be classified as {\textquoteleft}autochtonous{\textquoteright}, i.e. produced in situ (e.g. phytoplankton and microphytobenthos), or {\textquoteleft}allochtonous{\textquoteright}, i.e. transported into the estuary via river and seawater inflow. Together, these organic matter sources form an enormous energy pool, that is utilized by huge numbers of living organisms. The Schelde is a largely heterotrophic estuary, implying that allochtonous sources fuel the majority of the metabolic processes taking place within the system. This is most pronounced in the upstream reaches of the estuary, and is strikingly illustrated in the maximum turbidity zone. All this allochtonous carbon fuels a decomposer food web where bacteria, their protistan grazers, and rotifera and copepods feeding on protists form the link between detritus and the higher trophic levels like shrimps, fish and birds. The high bacterial activity results in oxygen depletion, which in turn causes a relatively species-poor food web. Downstream, the relative importance of autochtonous carbon increases, and an autotrophic, grazer food web develops in addition to the decomposer food web. In the water column, phytoplankton is grazed by copepods, which in turn are food for fish and shrimps. In the benthos, a large variety of algal grazers and detritus feeders exist, forming the basis of complex, interlinked food webs. Inspite of the high concentrations of available carbon and nutrients, much of the consumed sources are constantly being recycled within and between different trophic levels. Unraveling these food webs is often a complex task requiring sophisticated methods such as stable isotope tracer techniques.},
  author       = {Moens, Tom and Herman, Peter and Ysebaert, Tom},
  issn         = {0024-1520},
  journal      = {DE LEVENDE NATUUR},
  keyword      = {estuarium,plankton,voedselweb,benthos,Schelde},
  language     = {dut},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {52--55},
  title        = {Eten en gegeten worden in het Schelde-estuarium},
  volume       = {102},
  year         = {2001},
}