Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

Benzene formation in foods

Raquel Catarino Medeiros Vinci UGent, Bruno De Meulenaer UGent, Michael Canfyn , Thibault de Schaetzen , Ilse Van Overmeire and Joris Van Loco (2010) Exchange : open innovation for feed, food and health, where industry and academia meet. p.85-85
abstract
Benzene has been classified as carcinogenic to humans (Group 1) by the IARC. The occurrence of benzene in food has been attributed to several potential sources. One of these sources is benzoate, a widely used preservative, which may decarboxylate in the presence of ascorbic acid and metal ions. At low pH, hydroxyl radicals are supposed to be the key intermediate for this oxidative mechanism. Since several other reactions in foods may give rise to the generation of hydroxyl radicals, their potential to decarboxylate benzoate were evaluated in a formate buffer system (0.5 M) at pH 3 and 4 and incubated at 50°C for 5 days under light. Neither photo-induced oxidation in the presence of riboflavin or lipid oxidation and combinations of thereof were able to induce benzene formation from benzoate. In the ascorbate-transition metal ion system, lipids seemed to reduce benzene formation. This can probably be explained due to the lower availability of benzoate in the aqueous fraction because of its lipophylic character. As a further elaboration of the ascorbate-transition metal ion oxidative decarboxylation mechanism, this reaction was studied in various other buffers at pH 3 and 4. Remarkably, a strong effect of the type of buffer on the amounts of benzene generated from benzoate was observed. Thus especially citrate and acetate buffers seemed to enhance the decarboxylation reaction when compared to formate. From results, it can be concluded that care should be taken in the formulation of foodstuffs with respect to acidifiers in the presence of benzoate and ascorbate. Acidifiers may affect the benzene formation to a significant extent.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
published
subject
in
Exchange : open innovation for feed, food and health, where industry and academia meet
pages
85 - 85
publisher
Food2Know ; Ghent BC
conference name
Exchange : open innovation for feed, food and health, where industry and academia meet
conference location
Ghent, Belgium
conference start
2010-09-28
conference end
2010-09-28
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
C3
id
1174984
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1174984
date created
2011-02-28 11:43:44
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:36:40
@inproceedings{1174984,
  abstract     = {Benzene has been classified as carcinogenic to humans (Group 1) by the IARC. The occurrence of benzene in food has been attributed to several potential sources. One of these sources is benzoate, a widely used preservative, which may decarboxylate in the presence of ascorbic acid and metal ions. At low pH, hydroxyl radicals are supposed to be the key intermediate for this oxidative mechanism. Since several other reactions in foods may give rise to the generation of hydroxyl radicals, their potential to decarboxylate benzoate were evaluated in a formate buffer system (0.5 M) at pH 3 and 4 and incubated at 50{\textdegree}C for 5 days under light.
Neither photo-induced oxidation in the presence of riboflavin or lipid oxidation and combinations of thereof were able to induce benzene formation from benzoate. In the ascorbate-transition metal ion system, lipids seemed to reduce benzene formation. This can probably be explained due to the lower availability of benzoate in the aqueous fraction because of its lipophylic character. 
As a further elaboration of the ascorbate-transition metal ion oxidative decarboxylation mechanism, this reaction was studied in various other buffers at pH 3 and 4. Remarkably, a strong effect of the type of buffer on the amounts of benzene generated from benzoate was observed. Thus especially citrate and acetate buffers seemed to enhance the decarboxylation reaction when compared to formate.
From results, it can be concluded that care should be taken in the formulation of foodstuffs with respect to acidifiers in the presence of benzoate and ascorbate. Acidifiers may affect the benzene formation to a significant extent.},
  author       = {Catarino Medeiros Vinci, Raquel and De Meulenaer, Bruno and Canfyn , Michael  and de Schaetzen , Thibault  and Van Overmeire, Ilse  and Van Loco , Joris },
  booktitle    = {Exchange : open innovation for feed, food and health, where industry and academia meet},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Ghent, Belgium},
  pages        = {85--85},
  publisher    = {Food2Know ; Ghent BC},
  title        = {Benzene formation in foods},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Catarino Medeiros Vinci, Raquel, Bruno De Meulenaer, Michael Canfyn , Thibault de Schaetzen , Ilse Van Overmeire, and Joris Van Loco . 2010. “Benzene Formation in Foods.” In Exchange : Open Innovation for Feed, Food and Health, Where Industry and Academia Meet, 85–85. Food2Know ; Ghent BC.
APA
Catarino Medeiros Vinci, R., De Meulenaer, B., Canfyn , M., de Schaetzen , T., Van Overmeire, I., & Van Loco , J. (2010). Benzene formation in foods. Exchange : open innovation for feed, food and health, where industry and academia meet (pp. 85–85). Presented at the Exchange : open innovation for feed, food and health, where industry and academia meet, Food2Know ; Ghent BC.
Vancouver
1.
Catarino Medeiros Vinci R, De Meulenaer B, Canfyn M, de Schaetzen T, Van Overmeire I, Van Loco J. Benzene formation in foods. Exchange : open innovation for feed, food and health, where industry and academia meet. Food2Know ; Ghent BC; 2010. p. 85–85.
MLA
Catarino Medeiros Vinci, Raquel, Bruno De Meulenaer, Michael Canfyn , et al. “Benzene Formation in Foods.” Exchange : Open Innovation for Feed, Food and Health, Where Industry and Academia Meet. Food2Know ; Ghent BC, 2010. 85–85. Print.