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Chlamydophila psittaci in homing and feral pigeons and zoonotic transmission

Veerle Dickx UGent, Delphine Sylvie Anne Beeckman UGent, Liesbeth Dossche UGent, Paul Tavernier UGent and Daisy Vanrompay UGent (2010) JOURNAL OF MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY. 59(11). p.1348-1353
abstract
Chlamydiosis is a zoonotic disease in birds caused by Chlamydophila psittaci, an obligate intracellular bacterium. There are seven known avian outer-membrane protein A genotypes, A-F and E/B. The importance of genotyping lies in the fact that certain genotypes tend to be associated with certain hosts and a difference in virulence. Genotype B is the most prevalent in pigeons, but the more virulent genotypes A and D have also been discovered. The current study assessed the prevalence of C. psittaci in 32 Belgian homing-pigeon facilities and in 61 feral pigeons captured in the city of Ghent, Belgium. Additionally, zoonotic transmission of C. psittaci was investigated in the homing-pigeon facilities. Homing pigeons were often infected, as at least one of the lofts was positive in 13 of the 32 (40.6%) pigeon breeding facilities. Genotypes B, C and D were detected. Zoonotic transmission was discovered in 4 of the 32 (12.5%) pigeon fanciers, revealing genotype D in two of them, whilst genotyping was unsuccessful for the other two human pharyngeal swabs. This study clearly demonstrates the possible risk of C. psittaci zoonotic transmission from homing pigeons. Pigeon fanciers often (37.5%) used antibiotics for prevention of respiratory disease. Because of the risk of developing drug-resistant strains, regular use of antimicrobial drugs must be avoided. This study is believed to be the first to detect C. psittaci in Belgian feral pigeons. The prevalence rate in the city of Ghent was extremely low, which is beneficial for public health.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
CHLAMYDIA-PSITTACI, FREE-LIVING BIRDS, AVIAN CHLAMYDIOSIS, INFECTIONS, PREVALENCE, TURKEYS, EMPHASIS, SEROVARS, GENE
journal title
JOURNAL OF MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY
J. Med. Microbiol.
volume
59
issue
11
pages
1348 - 1353
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000283898100011
JCR category
MICROBIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
2.38 (2010)
JCR rank
54/103 (2010)
JCR quartile
3 (2010)
ISSN
0022-2615
DOI
10.1099/jmm.0.023499-0
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1174210
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1174210
date created
2011-02-28 09:34:45
date last changed
2011-03-22 16:43:49
@article{1174210,
  abstract     = {Chlamydiosis is a zoonotic disease in birds caused by Chlamydophila psittaci, an obligate intracellular bacterium. There are seven known avian outer-membrane protein A genotypes, A-F and E/B. The importance of genotyping lies in the fact that certain genotypes tend to be associated with certain hosts and a difference in virulence. Genotype B is the most prevalent in pigeons, but the more virulent genotypes A and D have also been discovered. The current study assessed the prevalence of C. psittaci in 32 Belgian homing-pigeon facilities and in 61 feral pigeons captured in the city of Ghent, Belgium. Additionally, zoonotic transmission of C. psittaci was investigated in the homing-pigeon facilities. Homing pigeons were often infected, as at least one of the lofts was positive in 13 of the 32 (40.6\%) pigeon breeding facilities. Genotypes B, C and D were detected. Zoonotic transmission was discovered in 4 of the 32 (12.5\%) pigeon fanciers, revealing genotype D in two of them, whilst genotyping was unsuccessful for the other two human pharyngeal swabs. This study clearly demonstrates the possible risk of C. psittaci zoonotic transmission from homing pigeons. Pigeon fanciers often (37.5\%) used antibiotics for prevention of respiratory disease. Because of the risk of developing drug-resistant strains, regular use of antimicrobial drugs must be avoided. This study is believed to be the first to detect C. psittaci in Belgian feral pigeons. The prevalence rate in the city of Ghent was extremely low, which is beneficial for public health.},
  author       = {Dickx, Veerle and Beeckman, Delphine Sylvie Anne and Dossche, Liesbeth and Tavernier, Paul and Vanrompay, Daisy},
  issn         = {0022-2615},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {CHLAMYDIA-PSITTACI,FREE-LIVING BIRDS,AVIAN CHLAMYDIOSIS,INFECTIONS,PREVALENCE,TURKEYS,EMPHASIS,SEROVARS,GENE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {1348--1353},
  title        = {Chlamydophila psittaci in homing and feral pigeons and zoonotic transmission},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/jmm.0.023499-0},
  volume       = {59},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Dickx, Veerle, Delphine Sylvie Anne Beeckman, Liesbeth Dossche, Paul Tavernier, and Daisy Vanrompay. 2010. “Chlamydophila Psittaci in Homing and Feral Pigeons and Zoonotic Transmission.” Journal of Medical Microbiology 59 (11): 1348–1353.
APA
Dickx, V., Beeckman, D. S. A., Dossche, L., Tavernier, P., & Vanrompay, D. (2010). Chlamydophila psittaci in homing and feral pigeons and zoonotic transmission. JOURNAL OF MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY, 59(11), 1348–1353.
Vancouver
1.
Dickx V, Beeckman DSA, Dossche L, Tavernier P, Vanrompay D. Chlamydophila psittaci in homing and feral pigeons and zoonotic transmission. JOURNAL OF MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY. 2010;59(11):1348–53.
MLA
Dickx, Veerle, Delphine Sylvie Anne Beeckman, Liesbeth Dossche, et al. “Chlamydophila Psittaci in Homing and Feral Pigeons and Zoonotic Transmission.” JOURNAL OF MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY 59.11 (2010): 1348–1353. Print.