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From 'artefact' to 'art by appropriation': carvings of Asmat and Kamoro of West New Guinea

Paulina van der Zee UGent (2007) Pacific art in world view : exhibition, research and relationships, proceeding paper. p.30-31
abstract
When the metamorphosis of ethnic objects into ‘art’ took place in the fifties of last century, the idea was that art was universal. Western people paid so to say respect to material culture of indigenous cultures by calling these objects art. But by claiming these objects as art, also western criteria were attached to them. In fact the approach remained still ‘Eurocentric’. This transformation of ethnic objects into ‘art’ can be regarded as one of the consequences of ‘collecting’. For western aesthetic appreciation and taste largely appoint the economic value of these objects.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
published
subject
keyword
non-western art, aesthetics, appropriation
in
Pacific art in world view : exhibition, research and relationships, proceeding paper
editor
Philippe Peltier
pages
30 - 31
publisher
Musée de Quai Branly
place of publication
Paris, France
conference name
PAA's 9th international symposium : Pacific art in world view : exhibition, research and relationships
conference location
Paris, France
conference start
2007-07-05
conference end
2007-07-07
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
C1
id
1171735
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1171735
date created
2011-02-25 14:50:38
date last changed
2017-01-02 09:52:28
@inproceedings{1171735,
  abstract     = {When the metamorphosis of ethnic objects into {\textquoteleft}art{\textquoteright} took place in the fifties of last century, the idea was that art was universal. Western people paid so to say respect to material culture of indigenous cultures by calling these objects art. But by claiming these objects as art, also western criteria were attached to them. In fact the approach remained still {\textquoteleft}Eurocentric{\textquoteright}. This transformation of ethnic objects into {\textquoteleft}art{\textquoteright} can be regarded as one of the consequences of {\textquoteleft}collecting{\textquoteright}. For western aesthetic appreciation and taste largely appoint the economic value of these objects.},
  author       = {van der Zee, Paulina},
  booktitle    = {Pacific art in world view : exhibition, research and relationships, proceeding paper},
  editor       = {Peltier, Philippe},
  keyword      = {non-western art,aesthetics,appropriation},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Paris, France},
  pages        = {30--31},
  publisher    = {Mus{\'e}e de Quai Branly},
  title        = {From 'artefact' to 'art by appropriation': carvings of Asmat and Kamoro of West New Guinea},
  year         = {2007},
}

Chicago
van der Zee, Paulina. 2007. “From ‘Artefact’ to ‘Art by Appropriation’: Carvings of Asmat and Kamoro of West New Guinea.” In Pacific Art in World View : Exhibition, Research and Relationships, Proceeding Paper, ed. Philippe Peltier, 30–31. Paris, France: Musée de Quai Branly.
APA
van der Zee, Paulina. (2007). From “artefact” to “art by appropriation”: carvings of Asmat and Kamoro of West New Guinea. In P. Peltier (Ed.), Pacific art in world view : exhibition, research and relationships, proceeding paper (pp. 30–31). Presented at the PAA’s 9th international symposium : Pacific art in world view : exhibition, research and relationships, Paris, France: Musée de Quai Branly.
Vancouver
1.
van der Zee P. From “artefact” to “art by appropriation”: carvings of Asmat and Kamoro of West New Guinea. In: Peltier P, editor. Pacific art in world view : exhibition, research and relationships, proceeding paper. Paris, France: Musée de Quai Branly; 2007. p. 30–1.
MLA
van der Zee, Paulina. “From ‘Artefact’ to ‘Art by Appropriation’: Carvings of Asmat and Kamoro of West New Guinea.” Pacific Art in World View : Exhibition, Research and Relationships, Proceeding Paper. Ed. Philippe Peltier. Paris, France: Musée de Quai Branly, 2007. 30–31. Print.