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Minimally heat-processed foods: QMRA vs. traditional safe harbours

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Introduction: Thermal treatment of food products is probably the oldest and most established food preservation technique. As early as 1810 Nicolas Apert received a price of 12.000 Francs for his research in thermal processing. More then a century later the botulinum cook, a 12D reduction of C. botulinum by heating 3 minutes at 121,1°C was established as one of the first safe harbours (SH). Research continued and led to the creation of several SH, each designed with a specific food product or microorganism in mind. Current situation: The vast majority of these processes were established using worst-case scenarios and are significantly ‘fail-safe’, i.e. they deliver more then required from a food safety point-of-view. The downside of this approach is a loss in quality, due to the effect of thermal processing on both sensorial and nutritional properties of the food product. In recent years, there has been a growing range of minimally processed products. Moreover, our understanding of the prevalence and behaviour of microorganisms is increasing and new concepts are developed with respect to food safety management, with emphasis on a chain-approach and quantitative tools for Microbiological risk-assessment (QMRA). Objectives: The objective of this research is to assess the effect on public health of deviating from the traditional SH in the production of Refrigerated Processed Foods of Extended Durability (REPFED). In contrast with traditional SH, QMRA includes the pre and post heat-treatment processing of REPFED’s in the food chain. The basis for the calculations is the equation proposed by ICMSF (2002): H0 - ΣR + ΣI ≤ FSO with H0 the raw material contamination, ∑R the sum of reduction steps, ∑I the sum of increases or growth and FSO the Food Safety Objective. The research is incorporating inactivation, potential for growth and sublethal injury of B. cereus and C. botulinum spores as well as the risk of post-contamination by L. monocytogenes. A range of conditions (e.g. process, raw materials, etc) between which it is deemed safe to deviate from the SH, is established in the food safety management system of a company. Therefore, a Microbial Assessment Scheme (MAS) is developed to set criteria and determine initial sampling locations for raw materials, intermediate and final products. A MAS will provide an insight in the microbial situation of a production process, and allows to deviate from the traditional SH.

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Chicago
Daelman, Jeff, Liesbeth Jacxsens, Annemie Geeraerd, Jan Van Impe, Frank Devlieghere, and Mieke Uyttendaele. 2010. “Minimally Heat-processed Foods: QMRA Vs. Traditional Safe Harbours.” In Food Micro, Abstracts.
APA
Daelman, Jeff, Jacxsens, L., Geeraerd, A., Van Impe, J., Devlieghere, F., & Uyttendaele, M. (2010). Minimally heat-processed foods: QMRA vs. traditional safe harbours. Food Micro, Abstracts. Presented at the 22nd International ICFMH Symposium (Food Micro 2010) : Microbial behavior in the food chain.
Vancouver
1.
Daelman J, Jacxsens L, Geeraerd A, Van Impe J, Devlieghere F, Uyttendaele M. Minimally heat-processed foods: QMRA vs. traditional safe harbours. Food Micro, Abstracts. 2010.
MLA
Daelman, Jeff, Liesbeth Jacxsens, Annemie Geeraerd, et al. “Minimally Heat-processed Foods: QMRA Vs. Traditional Safe Harbours.” Food Micro, Abstracts. 2010. Print.
@inproceedings{1170941,
  abstract     = {Introduction: Thermal treatment of food products is probably the oldest and most established food preservation technique. As early as 1810 Nicolas Apert received a price of 12.000 Francs for his research in thermal processing. More then a century later the botulinum cook, a 12D reduction of C. botulinum by heating 3 minutes at 121,1{\textdegree}C was established as one of the first safe harbours (SH). Research continued and led to the creation of several SH, each designed with a specific food product or microorganism in mind.
Current situation: The vast majority of these processes were established using worst-case scenarios and are significantly {\textquoteleft}fail-safe{\textquoteright}, i.e. they deliver more then required from a food safety point-of-view. The downside of this approach is a loss in quality, due to the effect of thermal processing on both sensorial and nutritional properties of the food product. In recent years, there has been a growing range of minimally processed products. Moreover, our understanding of the prevalence and behaviour of microorganisms is increasing and new concepts are developed with respect to food safety management, with emphasis on a chain-approach and quantitative tools for Microbiological risk-assessment (QMRA).
Objectives: The objective of this research is to assess the effect on public health of deviating from the traditional SH in the production of Refrigerated Processed Foods of Extended Durability (REPFED). In contrast with traditional SH, QMRA includes the pre and post heat-treatment processing of REPFED{\textquoteright}s in the food chain. The basis for the calculations is the equation proposed by ICMSF (2002): H0 - \ensuremath{\Sigma}R + \ensuremath{\Sigma}I \ensuremath{\leq} FSO with H0 the raw material contamination, \ensuremath{\sum}R the sum of reduction steps, \ensuremath{\sum}I the sum of increases or growth and FSO the Food Safety Objective. The research is incorporating inactivation, potential for growth and sublethal injury of B. cereus and C. botulinum spores as well as the risk of post-contamination by L. monocytogenes. A range of conditions (e.g. process, raw materials, etc) between which it is deemed safe to deviate from the SH, is established in the food safety management system of a company. Therefore, a Microbial Assessment Scheme (MAS) is developed to set criteria and determine initial sampling locations for raw materials, intermediate and final products. A MAS will provide an insight in the microbial situation of a production process, and allows to deviate from the traditional SH.},
  author       = {Daelman, Jeff and Jacxsens, Liesbeth and Geeraerd, Annemie and Van Impe, Jan and Devlieghere, Frank and Uyttendaele, Mieke},
  booktitle    = {Food Micro, Abstracts},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Copenhagen, Denmark},
  title        = {Minimally heat-processed foods: QMRA vs. traditional safe harbours},
  year         = {2010},
}