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Funerary ritual as a means of land appropriation?

Lieve Donnellan UGent (2011) 42nd Annual Chacmool Archaeology Conference, Proceedings. p.62-73
abstract
The paper re-examines evidence of the earliest tumuli (sixth century BC) in the Greek colony Istros (Histria), on the Romanian coast of the Black Sea. Past scholarship tried to explain the cremation rituals and their human sacrifices as belonging to the customs of the local Thracian aristocracy. Others have referred to barbaranised Greeks or “mix-Hellens” or Homeric rites. The funerary rites of Istros find close parallels in the indigenous graves of the same period. The paper argues, following post-colonial theories, that rigid ethnic dichotomies of colonial societies should be avoided, and that all participants, colonized and colonizers, construct meaningful realities. In Istros the funerary rituals and identities find a better understanding if considered as “appropriation”: Greeks adopted and re-interpreted local customs in order to maintain themselves and their power positions in a time when these were questioned.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
published
subject
keyword
identity, Funerary ritual, Greek colonization
in
42nd Annual Chacmool Archaeology Conference, Proceedings
editor
Lindsey Amundsen-Meyer, Nicole Engel and Sean Pickering
pages
62 - 73
publisher
Chacmool Archaeological Association University of Calgary
place of publication
Calgary, Canada
conference name
Annual Chacmool Archaeology Conference
conference location
Calgary, Canada
conference start
2009-11-13
conference end
2009-11-15
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
C1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1168466
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1168466
date created
2011-02-24 11:14:52
date last changed
2011-03-31 15:17:11
@inproceedings{1168466,
  abstract     = {The paper re-examines evidence of the earliest tumuli (sixth century BC) in the Greek colony Istros (Histria), on the Romanian coast of the Black Sea. Past scholarship tried to explain the cremation rituals and their human sacrifices as belonging to the customs of the local Thracian aristocracy. Others have referred to barbaranised Greeks or {\textquotedblleft}mix-Hellens{\textquotedblright} or Homeric rites. The funerary rites of Istros find close parallels in the indigenous graves of the same period. The paper argues, following post-colonial theories, that rigid ethnic dichotomies of colonial societies should be avoided, and that all participants, colonized and colonizers, construct meaningful realities. In Istros the funerary rituals and identities find a better understanding if considered as {\textquotedblleft}appropriation{\textquotedblright}: Greeks adopted and re-interpreted local customs in order to maintain themselves and their power positions in a time when these were questioned.},
  author       = {Donnellan, Lieve},
  booktitle    = {42nd Annual Chacmool Archaeology Conference, Proceedings},
  editor       = {Amundsen-Meyer, Lindsey and Engel, Nicole and Pickering, Sean},
  keyword      = {identity,Funerary ritual,Greek colonization},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Calgary, Canada},
  pages        = {62--73},
  publisher    = {Chacmool Archaeological Association University of Calgary},
  title        = {Funerary ritual as a means of land appropriation?},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Donnellan, Lieve. 2011. “Funerary Ritual as a Means of Land Appropriation?” In 42nd Annual Chacmool Archaeology Conference, Proceedings, ed. Lindsey Amundsen-Meyer, Nicole Engel, and Sean Pickering, 62–73. Calgary, Canada: Chacmool Archaeological Association University of Calgary.
APA
Donnellan, L. (2011). Funerary ritual as a means of land appropriation? In L. Amundsen-Meyer, N. Engel, & S. Pickering (Eds.), 42nd Annual Chacmool Archaeology Conference, Proceedings (pp. 62–73). Presented at the Annual Chacmool Archaeology Conference, Calgary, Canada: Chacmool Archaeological Association University of Calgary.
Vancouver
1.
Donnellan L. Funerary ritual as a means of land appropriation? In: Amundsen-Meyer L, Engel N, Pickering S, editors. 42nd Annual Chacmool Archaeology Conference, Proceedings. Calgary, Canada: Chacmool Archaeological Association University of Calgary; 2011. p. 62–73.
MLA
Donnellan, Lieve. “Funerary Ritual as a Means of Land Appropriation?” 42nd Annual Chacmool Archaeology Conference, Proceedings. Ed. Lindsey Amundsen-Meyer, Nicole Engel, & Sean Pickering. Calgary, Canada: Chacmool Archaeological Association University of Calgary, 2011. 62–73. Print.