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Recovery of post-agricultural forest: tree species determines soil properties and possibilities for ecosystem restoration

An De Schrijver UGent, Lander Baeten UGent, Elke De Clerck, Arno Thomaes UGent, Luc De Keersmaeker UGent, Jeroen Staelens UGent, Karen Wuyts UGent, Karin Hansen, Lars Vesterdal and Bart Muys UGent, et al. (2009) Working papers of the Finnish Forest Research Institute. 128. p.498-498
abstract
Reforestation of agricultural land in many European countries has progressed more slowly than anticipated. Many years’ fertilization has caused an accumulation of nutrients in the top soil layer. Phosphorus (P) has proven to be particularly persistent and elevated concentrations in soil and vegetation are found up to thousands of years after agricultural abandonment. This persistently elevated bioavailable P is a paradox for ecosystem recovery in post-agricultural forests: on one hand, higher P bioavailability stimulates stand productivity and tree growth but, on the other hand, it limits the development of typical forest plant communities (Baeten et al. in press) and associated organisms. Limitation of bioavailable P seems to be a necessity for the recovery of species-rich target communities and for the conservation of endangered species (Wassen et al. 2005). Reforestation of agricultural land results in a decrease in soil pH with increasing forest age, but the extent and rate of soil acidification differs highly between tree species. Gymnosperm tree species are often contrasted to angiosperms because of their acidifying impact on soils. We will present data showing that rapid (within 2 decades) changes in soil properties can also occur beneath different broadleaved tree species. Ca concentra¬tions in leaf litter seem to be the driving factor for differences between species: tree species with higher litter Ca concentrations such as Populus and Fraxinus support a significantly higher soil pH, base saturation degree and lower quantities of bioavailable aluminum compared to the Ca-poor Fagus and Quercus species. Tilia and Prunus trees are intermediate between these ‘soil preservers’ and ‘soil acidifiers’. Furthermore, tree species have a major influence on the short-term and long-term bioavailability of P. Below ‘soil acidifiers’ we found significantly higher bioavailable and slowly cycling P fractions compared to ‘soil preservers’ which mainly retained P in less soluble pools. To date, there are no integrated studies on the long-term effect of different broadleaved tree species on soil properties in general and the bioavailability of P through soil acidification in particular. Most studies evaluating the bioavailability of P use extraction methods that only provide short-term dose-response insights into the readily available P pool for plants and soil microbes. However, for studying the role of P in recovering (semi)natural ecosystems, it is much more relevant to gain insight into time-scales extending a single growing season (Richter et al. 2006) and to include more slowly cycling P fractions. We discuss six common garden experiments in which broadleaved tree species have been planted on loamy agricultural soil for between 5 and 35 years. We argue that vegetation choice can be an important driver of regional biogeochemistry and biodiversity.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
published
subject
in
Working papers of the Finnish Forest Research Institute
editor
Liisa Ukunmaanaho, Tiina M Nieminen and Mike Starr
volume
128
issue title
6th International Symposium on Ecosystem Behaviour BIOGEOMON 2009 : conference programme and abstracts
pages
498 - 498
publisher
Finnish Forest Research Institute
place of publication
Vantaa, Finland
conference name
6th International symposium on Ecosystem Behaviour BIOGEOMON 2009
conference location
Helsinki, Finland
conference start
2009-06-29
conference end
2009-07-03
ISSN
1795-150X
ISBN
9789514021763
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
C3
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
1165602
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1165602
alternative location
http://www.metla.fi/julkaisut/workingpapers/2009/mwp128.pdf
date created
2011-02-23 10:19:50
date last changed
2011-05-05 15:53:03
@inproceedings{1165602,
  abstract     = {Reforestation of agricultural land in many European countries has progressed more slowly than anticipated. Many years{\textquoteright} fertilization has caused an accumulation of nutrients in the top soil layer. Phosphorus (P) has proven to be particularly persistent and elevated concentrations in soil and vegetation are found up to thousands of years after agricultural abandonment. This persistently elevated bioavailable P is a paradox for ecosystem recovery in post-agricultural forests: on one hand, higher P bioavailability stimulates stand productivity and tree growth but, on the other hand, it limits the development of typical forest plant communities (Baeten et al. in press) and associated organisms. Limitation of bioavailable P seems to be a necessity for the recovery of species-rich target communities and for the conservation of endangered species (Wassen et al. 2005). Reforestation of agricultural land results in a decrease in soil pH with increasing forest age, but the extent and rate of soil acidification differs highly between tree species. Gymnosperm tree species are often contrasted to angiosperms because of their acidifying impact on soils. We will present data showing that rapid (within 2 decades) changes in soil properties can also occur beneath different broadleaved tree species. Ca concentra{\textlnot}tions in leaf litter seem to be the driving factor for differences between species: tree species with higher litter Ca concentrations such as Populus and Fraxinus support a significantly higher soil pH, base saturation degree and lower quantities of bioavailable aluminum compared to the Ca-poor Fagus and Quercus species. Tilia and Prunus trees are intermediate between these {\textquoteleft}soil preservers{\textquoteright} and {\textquoteleft}soil acidifiers{\textquoteright}. Furthermore, tree species have a major influence on the short-term and long-term bioavailability of P. Below {\textquoteleft}soil acidifiers{\textquoteright} we found significantly higher bioavailable and slowly cycling P fractions compared to {\textquoteleft}soil preservers{\textquoteright} which mainly retained P in less soluble pools. To date, there are no integrated studies on the long-term effect of different broadleaved tree species on soil properties in general and the bioavailability of P through soil acidification in particular. Most studies evaluating the bioavailability of P use extraction methods that only provide short-term dose-response insights into the readily available P pool for plants and soil microbes. However, for studying the role of P in recovering (semi)natural ecosystems, it is much more relevant to gain insight into time-scales extending a single growing season (Richter et al. 2006) and to include more slowly cycling P fractions. We discuss six common garden experiments in which broadleaved tree species have been planted on loamy agricultural soil for between 5 and 35 years. We argue that vegetation choice can be an important driver of regional biogeochemistry and biodiversity.},
  author       = {De Schrijver, An and Baeten, Lander and De Clerck, Elke and Thomaes, Arno and De Keersmaeker, Luc and Staelens, Jeroen and Wuyts, Karen and Hansen, Karin and Vesterdal, Lars and Muys, Bart and DE NEVE, STEFAAN and Verheyen, Kris},
  booktitle    = {Working papers of the Finnish Forest Research Institute},
  editor       = {Ukunmaanaho, Liisa and Nieminen, Tiina M and Starr, Mike},
  isbn         = {9789514021763},
  issn         = {1795-150X},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Helsinki, Finland},
  pages        = {498--498},
  publisher    = {Finnish Forest Research Institute},
  title        = {Recovery of post-agricultural forest: tree species determines soil properties and possibilities for ecosystem restoration},
  url          = {http://www.metla.fi/julkaisut/workingpapers/2009/mwp128.pdf},
  volume       = {128},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
De Schrijver, An, Lander Baeten, Elke De Clerck, Arno Thomaes, Luc De Keersmaeker, Jeroen Staelens, Karen Wuyts, et al. 2009. “Recovery of Post-agricultural Forest: Tree Species Determines Soil Properties and Possibilities for Ecosystem Restoration.” In Working Papers of the Finnish Forest Research Institute, ed. Liisa Ukunmaanaho, Tiina M Nieminen, and Mike Starr, 128:498–498. Vantaa, Finland: Finnish Forest Research Institute.
APA
De Schrijver, An, Baeten, L., De Clerck, E., Thomaes, A., De Keersmaeker, L., Staelens, J., Wuyts, K., et al. (2009). Recovery of post-agricultural forest: tree species determines soil properties and possibilities for ecosystem restoration. In L. Ukunmaanaho, T. M. Nieminen, & M. Starr (Eds.), Working papers of the Finnish Forest Research Institute (Vol. 128, pp. 498–498). Presented at the 6th International symposium on Ecosystem Behaviour BIOGEOMON 2009, Vantaa, Finland: Finnish Forest Research Institute.
Vancouver
1.
De Schrijver A, Baeten L, De Clerck E, Thomaes A, De Keersmaeker L, Staelens J, et al. Recovery of post-agricultural forest: tree species determines soil properties and possibilities for ecosystem restoration. In: Ukunmaanaho L, Nieminen TM, Starr M, editors. Working papers of the Finnish Forest Research Institute. Vantaa, Finland: Finnish Forest Research Institute; 2009. p. 498–498.
MLA
De Schrijver, An, Lander Baeten, Elke De Clerck, et al. “Recovery of Post-agricultural Forest: Tree Species Determines Soil Properties and Possibilities for Ecosystem Restoration.” Working Papers of the Finnish Forest Research Institute. Ed. Liisa Ukunmaanaho, Tiina M Nieminen, & Mike Starr. Vol. 128. Vantaa, Finland: Finnish Forest Research Institute, 2009. 498–498. Print.