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Dehalogenation of environmental pollutants in microbial electrolysis cells with biogenic palladium nanoparticles

Tom Hennebel UGent, Jessica Benner UGent, Peter Clauwaert UGent, Lynn Vanhaecke UGent, Peter Aelterman UGent, Ruben Callebaut, Nico Boon UGent and Willy Verstraete UGent (2011) BIOTECHNOLOGY LETTERS. 33(1). p.89-95
abstract
Purpose of work Hydrodehalogenation of persistent pollutants, such as the groundwater contaminants trichloroethylene and diatrizoate, are catalyzed by biogenic Pd nanoparticles. As H-2 gas supply for the dehalogenation reactions is still the limiting factor, this study examines in situ H-2 production in the cathode of a microbial electrolysis cell. In a biogenic Pd nanoparticle (bio-Pd) free microbial electrolysis cell (MEC), dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) with concomitant chloride and ethane formation was achieved in the cathode compartment at a removal rate of 120 g TCE m(-3) total cathode compartment (TCC) day(-1), applying -0.8 V with a power source. When the cathode granules were coated with 5 mg bio-Pd g(-1) graphite, chloride and ethane formation increased to 151 g TCE m(-3) TCC day(-1) corresponding with a specific removal rate of 48 mg TCE g(-1) Pd day(-1). In both cases, formation of unwanted byproducts, such as vinyl chloride, was not significant. When the same setup was applied for transformation of the iodinated contrast medium diatrizoate (diaI(3)), reduction in a catalyst-free cathode of a MEC resulted in a removal of 48 +/- 9% during the first h corresponding to 3 g diaI(3) m(-3) TCC day(-1). Coating the cathodic graphite granules with bio-Pd enhanced the transformation resulting in a 93 +/- 4% removal during the first h corresponding to 6 g diaI(3) m(-3) TCC day(-1). These results suggest that MECs can produce H-2 in a sustainable way to provide an economical interesting reactant for bio-Pd catalyzed dehalogenation reactions.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
REACTOR, Nanotechnology, Groundwater remediation, SHEWANELLA-ONEIDENSIS, POLYCHLORINATED-BIPHENYLS, BIOCATALYTIC DECHLORINATION, BIOINORGANIC CATALYST, TRICHLOROETHYLENE, GRAPHITE, SYSTEMS, REMOVAL, Bioelectrical system, Catalysis, Dechlorination
journal title
BIOTECHNOLOGY LETTERS
Biotechnol. Lett.
volume
33
issue
1
pages
89 - 95
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000285914500011
JCR category
BIOTECHNOLOGY & APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
1.683 (2011)
JCR rank
95/157 (2011)
JCR quartile
3 (2011)
ISSN
0141-5492
DOI
10.1007/s10529-010-0393-7
project
Biotechnology for a sustainable economy (Bio-Economy)
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1162726
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1162726
date created
2011-02-21 15:06:23
date last changed
2013-02-27 09:37:19
@article{1162726,
  abstract     = {Purpose of work Hydrodehalogenation of persistent pollutants, such as the groundwater contaminants trichloroethylene and diatrizoate, are catalyzed by biogenic Pd nanoparticles. As H-2 gas supply for the dehalogenation reactions is still the limiting factor, this study examines in situ H-2 production in the cathode of a microbial electrolysis cell.
In a biogenic Pd nanoparticle (bio-Pd) free microbial electrolysis cell (MEC), dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) with concomitant chloride and ethane formation was achieved in the cathode compartment at a removal rate of 120 g TCE m(-3) total cathode compartment (TCC) day(-1), applying -0.8 V with a power source. When the cathode granules were coated with 5 mg bio-Pd g(-1) graphite, chloride and ethane formation increased to 151 g TCE m(-3) TCC day(-1) corresponding with a specific removal rate of 48 mg TCE g(-1) Pd day(-1). In both cases, formation of unwanted byproducts, such as vinyl chloride, was not significant. When the same setup was applied for transformation of the iodinated contrast medium diatrizoate (diaI(3)), reduction in a catalyst-free cathode of a MEC resulted in a removal of 48 +/- 9\% during the first h corresponding to 3 g diaI(3) m(-3) TCC day(-1). Coating the cathodic graphite granules with bio-Pd enhanced the transformation resulting in a 93 +/- 4\% removal during the first h corresponding to 6 g diaI(3) m(-3) TCC day(-1). These results suggest that MECs can produce H-2 in a sustainable way to provide an economical interesting reactant for bio-Pd catalyzed dehalogenation reactions.},
  author       = {Hennebel, Tom and Benner, Jessica and Clauwaert, Peter and Vanhaecke, Lynn and Aelterman, Peter and Callebaut, Ruben and Boon, Nico and Verstraete, Willy},
  issn         = {0141-5492},
  journal      = {BIOTECHNOLOGY LETTERS},
  keyword      = {REACTOR,Nanotechnology,Groundwater remediation,SHEWANELLA-ONEIDENSIS,POLYCHLORINATED-BIPHENYLS,BIOCATALYTIC DECHLORINATION,BIOINORGANIC CATALYST,TRICHLOROETHYLENE,GRAPHITE,SYSTEMS,REMOVAL,Bioelectrical system,Catalysis,Dechlorination},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {89--95},
  title        = {Dehalogenation of environmental pollutants in microbial electrolysis cells with biogenic palladium nanoparticles},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10529-010-0393-7},
  volume       = {33},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Hennebel, Tom, Jessica Benner, Peter Clauwaert, Lynn Vanhaecke, Peter Aelterman, Ruben Callebaut, Nico Boon, and Willy Verstraete. 2011. “Dehalogenation of Environmental Pollutants in Microbial Electrolysis Cells with Biogenic Palladium Nanoparticles.” Biotechnology Letters 33 (1): 89–95.
APA
Hennebel, T., Benner, J., Clauwaert, P., Vanhaecke, L., Aelterman, P., Callebaut, R., Boon, N., et al. (2011). Dehalogenation of environmental pollutants in microbial electrolysis cells with biogenic palladium nanoparticles. BIOTECHNOLOGY LETTERS, 33(1), 89–95.
Vancouver
1.
Hennebel T, Benner J, Clauwaert P, Vanhaecke L, Aelterman P, Callebaut R, et al. Dehalogenation of environmental pollutants in microbial electrolysis cells with biogenic palladium nanoparticles. BIOTECHNOLOGY LETTERS. 2011;33(1):89–95.
MLA
Hennebel, Tom, Jessica Benner, Peter Clauwaert, et al. “Dehalogenation of Environmental Pollutants in Microbial Electrolysis Cells with Biogenic Palladium Nanoparticles.” BIOTECHNOLOGY LETTERS 33.1 (2011): 89–95. Print.