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A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of vitamin A in Mozambican children hospitalized with non-measles acute lower respiratory tract infections

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Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to test the potential of routine vitamin A supplementation at admission to speed up recovery during hospitalization for acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRI) and to decrease the levels of morbidity at 6 weeks after discharge. The study was conducted in the Central Hospital of Maputo (CHM), Mozambique, from 1995 to 1997. METHODS: Children aged 6-72 months with ALRI admitted to the paediatric wards of the CHM were assigned to a supplementation group (n = 71, receiving 200 000 IU of vitamin A) or a control group (n = 93, receiving a placebo). RESULTS: The prevalence of vitamin A deficiency was very high and similar between the two groups. The median number of inpatient days for the supplementation group was 3, for the placebo group 4 days. On day 5 the rate of clinical discharge was 88.4% (n = 61/69) in the experimental intervention group and 73.9% (n = 65/88) in the placebo group (P = 0.023). CONCLUSION: We found a statistically significant reduction in duration of admission among vitamin A-supplemented children with ALRI. This effect is in line with what is known about the role of vitamin A in human defence and immune mechanisms and with the serological evidence of the extent of vitamin A deficiency among the children in this trial.
Keywords
vitamin A, EFFICACY, supplementation, ALRI, RCT, Mocambique, A-DEFICIENCY, MILD VITAMIN, CHILDHOOD PNEUMONIA, MEASLES, MORBIDITY

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Chicago
Julien, Manuel Romano, Aurélio da Cruz Gomes, Luis Varandas, Wim Van Lerberghe, Paula Rodrigues, Filomena Malveiro, Pedro Aguiar, et al. 1999. “A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Clinical Trial of Vitamin A in Mozambican Children Hospitalized with Non-measles Acute Lower Respiratory Tract Infections.” Tropical Medicine & International Health 4 (12): 794–800.
APA
Julien, M. R., da Cruz Gomes, A., Varandas, L., Van Lerberghe, W., Rodrigues, P., Malveiro, F., Aguiar, P., et al. (1999). A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of vitamin A in Mozambican children hospitalized with non-measles acute lower respiratory tract infections. TROPICAL MEDICINE & INTERNATIONAL HEALTH, 4(12), 794–800.
Vancouver
1.
Julien MR, da Cruz Gomes A, Varandas L, Van Lerberghe W, Rodrigues P, Malveiro F, et al. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of vitamin A in Mozambican children hospitalized with non-measles acute lower respiratory tract infections. TROPICAL MEDICINE & INTERNATIONAL HEALTH. 1999;4(12):794–800.
MLA
Julien, Manuel Romano, Aurélio da Cruz Gomes, Luis Varandas, et al. “A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Clinical Trial of Vitamin A in Mozambican Children Hospitalized with Non-measles Acute Lower Respiratory Tract Infections.” TROPICAL MEDICINE & INTERNATIONAL HEALTH 4.12 (1999): 794–800. Print.
@article{115825,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to test the potential of routine vitamin A supplementation at admission to speed up recovery during hospitalization for acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRI) and to decrease the levels of morbidity at 6 weeks after discharge. The study was conducted in the Central Hospital of Maputo (CHM), Mozambique, from 1995 to 1997.
METHODS: Children aged 6-72 months with ALRI admitted to the paediatric wards of the CHM were assigned to a supplementation group (n = 71, receiving 200 000 IU of vitamin A) or a control group (n = 93, receiving a placebo).
RESULTS: The prevalence of vitamin A deficiency was very high and similar between the two groups. The median number of inpatient days for the supplementation group was 3, for the placebo group 4 days. On day 5 the rate of clinical discharge was 88.4% (n = 61/69) in the experimental intervention group and 73.9% (n = 65/88) in the placebo group (P = 0.023).
CONCLUSION: We found a statistically significant reduction in duration of admission among vitamin A-supplemented children with ALRI. This effect is in line with what is known about the role of vitamin A in human defence and immune mechanisms and with the serological evidence of the extent of vitamin A deficiency among the children in this trial.},
  author       = {Julien, Manuel Romano and da Cruz Gomes, Aurélio and Varandas, Luis and Van Lerberghe, Wim and Rodrigues, Paula and Malveiro, Filomena and Aguiar, Pedro and Kolsteren, Patrick and Van Der Stuyft, Patrick and Hildebrand, Katherine and Labadarios, Demetre and Ferrinho, Paulo},
  issn         = {1360-2276},
  journal      = {TROPICAL MEDICINE & INTERNATIONAL HEALTH},
  keywords     = {vitamin A,EFFICACY,supplementation,ALRI,RCT,Mocambique,A-DEFICIENCY,MILD VITAMIN,CHILDHOOD PNEUMONIA,MEASLES,MORBIDITY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {794--800},
  title        = {A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of vitamin A in Mozambican children hospitalized with non-measles acute lower respiratory tract infections},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-3156.1999.00493.x},
  volume       = {4},
  year         = {1999},
}

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