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Effects of management practices on water yield in small headwater catchments at Cordillera de los Andes in southern Chile

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Abstract
In several parts of the world, drinking water is obtained from springs in natural and managed mountainous forests. Since forests regulate quality as well as quantity of water, the effects of forest-management activities on water yield are an important subject of study. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of forest management on water yield in managed and unmanaged temperate native rainforests in the Andean range of southern Chile. The study area is located in San Pablo, a forest reserve of 2,184 ha located at the Andean range of southern Chile (39º 35’ S, 72º 07’ W, 600-925 m a.s.l.). From April 2003 to October 2008, seven experimental small catchments were monitored for rainfall, throughfall, stemflow, soil water infiltration, soil water percolation and runoff. In 2002, one catchment with a secondary deciduous forest was managed, through thinning, causing a reduction in basal area by 35% whereas the other one remained unthinned as control. Both watersheds are adjacent and are located at 600 – 720 m of elevation on deep loam textured volcanic soils (100 - 120 cm). In November 2006, a watershed covered with evergreen old-growth forests was thinned extracting 40% of the total basal area whereas another adjacent catchment remained unthinned as control. Both watersheds are located at 725 – 910 m a.s.l. and have the same aspects. The effects of management of deciduous secondary forests showed that for the period April 2003-March 2007, the mean value of the increase in total annual streamflow was 12.7%, ranging from 10.9% to 14.6%. Thinning of the evergreen old-growth forest increased the streamflow for the period November 2006-October 2008 with 6.1%, ranging from 4.4% to 7.8%, with greater differences during summertime (15.7 to 206%).

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Chicago
Oyarzún, Carlos, Jeroen Staelens, Niko Verhoest, and Roberto Godoy. 2009. “Effects of Management Practices on Water Yield in Small Headwater Catchments at Cordillera De Los Andes in Southern Chile.” In Ecological Advances on Chilean Temperate Rainforests, ed. Niko Verhoest, Pascal Boeckx, Carlos Oyarzún, and Roberto Godoy, 55–63. Ghent, Belgium: Academia Press.
APA
Oyarzún, C., Staelens, J., Verhoest, N., & Godoy, R. (2009). Effects of management practices on water yield in small headwater catchments at Cordillera de los Andes in southern Chile. In N. Verhoest, P. Boeckx, C. Oyarzún, & R. Godoy (Eds.), Ecological advances on Chilean temperate rainforests (pp. 55–63). Ghent, Belgium: Academia Press.
Vancouver
1.
Oyarzún C, Staelens J, Verhoest N, Godoy R. Effects of management practices on water yield in small headwater catchments at Cordillera de los Andes in southern Chile. In: Verhoest N, Boeckx P, Oyarzún C, Godoy R, editors. Ecological advances on Chilean temperate rainforests. Ghent, Belgium: Academia Press; 2009. p. 55–63.
MLA
Oyarzún, Carlos et al. “Effects of Management Practices on Water Yield in Small Headwater Catchments at Cordillera De Los Andes in Southern Chile.” Ecological Advances on Chilean Temperate Rainforests. Ed. Niko Verhoest et al. Ghent, Belgium: Academia Press, 2009. 55–63. Print.
@incollection{1154461,
  abstract     = {In several parts of the world, drinking water is obtained from springs in natural and managed mountainous forests. Since forests regulate quality as well as quantity of water, the effects of forest-management activities on water yield are an important subject of study. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of forest management on water yield in managed and unmanaged temperate native rainforests in the Andean range of southern Chile. The study area is located in San Pablo, a forest reserve of 2,184 ha located at the Andean range of southern Chile (39º 35’ S, 72º 07’ W, 600-925 m a.s.l.). From April 2003 to October 2008, seven experimental small catchments were monitored for rainfall, throughfall, stemflow, soil water infiltration, soil water percolation and runoff. In 2002, one catchment with a secondary deciduous forest was managed, through thinning, causing a reduction in basal area by 35% whereas the other one remained unthinned as control. Both watersheds are adjacent and are located at 600 – 720 m of elevation on deep loam textured volcanic soils (100 - 120 cm). In November 2006, a watershed covered with evergreen old-growth forests was thinned extracting 40% of the total basal area whereas another adjacent catchment remained unthinned as control. Both watersheds are located at 725 – 910 m a.s.l. and have the same aspects. The effects of management of deciduous secondary forests showed that for the period April 2003-March 2007, the mean value of the increase in total annual streamflow was 12.7%, ranging from 10.9% to 14.6%. Thinning of the evergreen old-growth forest increased the streamflow for the period November 2006-October 2008 with 6.1%, ranging from 4.4% to 7.8%, with greater differences during summertime (15.7 to 206%).},
  author       = {Oyarzún, Carlos and Staelens, Jeroen and Verhoest, Niko and Godoy, Roberto},
  booktitle    = {Ecological advances on Chilean temperate rainforests},
  editor       = {Verhoest, Niko and Boeckx, Pascal and Oyarzún, Carlos and Godoy, Roberto},
  isbn         = {9789038214788},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {55--63},
  publisher    = {Academia Press},
  title        = {Effects of management practices on water yield in small headwater catchments at Cordillera de los Andes in southern Chile},
  year         = {2009},
}