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Monarchy and mass communication: Antioch A.D. 362/3 revisited

Lieve Van Hoof (UGent) and Peter Van Nuffelen (UGent)
(2011) JOURNAL OF ROMAN STUDIES. 101. p.166-184
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Abstract
The A.D. 362/3 crisis in Antioch is usually interpreted as an economic or ideological crisis, and Julian's Misopogon as a 'festive satire' or 'edict of chastisement'. This article situates the root of the problem in a crisis of communication: Julian's failure to communicate publicly as expected in a situation that was tense because of the food shortage led to a short-circuit between emperor and subjects. Whilst the Misopogon is Julian's extraordinary post-factum attempt to explain away this failure of ritualized communication on his part, Libanius' speeches on the topic seek to give a positive twist to the extraordinary nature of Julian's reply, which posed serious problems for emperor, city, and sophist alike.
Keywords
EMPIRE, Late Antiquity, Julian, Libanius, Antioch

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Van Hoof, Lieve, and Peter Van Nuffelen. 2011. “Monarchy and Mass Communication: Antioch A.D. 362/3 Revisited.” Journal of Roman Studies 101: 166–184.
APA
Van Hoof, L., & Van Nuffelen, P. (2011). Monarchy and mass communication: Antioch A.D. 362/3 revisited. JOURNAL OF ROMAN STUDIES, 101, 166–184.
Vancouver
1.
Van Hoof L, Van Nuffelen P. Monarchy and mass communication: Antioch A.D. 362/3 revisited. JOURNAL OF ROMAN STUDIES. 2011;101:166–84.
MLA
Van Hoof, Lieve, and Peter Van Nuffelen. “Monarchy and Mass Communication: Antioch A.D. 362/3 Revisited.” JOURNAL OF ROMAN STUDIES 101 (2011): 166–184. Print.
@article{1151633,
  abstract     = {The A.D. 362/3 crisis in Antioch is usually interpreted as an economic or ideological crisis, and Julian's Misopogon as a 'festive satire' or 'edict of chastisement'. This article situates the root of the problem in a crisis of communication: Julian's failure to communicate publicly as expected in a situation that was tense because of the food shortage led to a short-circuit between emperor and subjects. Whilst the Misopogon is Julian's extraordinary post-factum attempt to explain away this failure of ritualized communication on his part, Libanius' speeches on the topic seek to give a positive twist to the extraordinary nature of Julian's reply, which posed serious problems for emperor, city, and sophist alike.},
  author       = {Van Hoof, Lieve and Van Nuffelen, Peter},
  issn         = {0075-4358},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF ROMAN STUDIES},
  keywords     = {EMPIRE,Late Antiquity,Julian,Libanius,Antioch},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {166--184},
  title        = {Monarchy and mass communication: Antioch A.D. 362/3 revisited},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0075435811000050},
  volume       = {101},
  year         = {2011},
}

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