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Transnational environmental crime and its governance: gaps in theory and research

Lieselot Bisschop (2010) European Society of Criminology, 10th Annual conference, Abstracts.
abstract
Despite their significance and harmfulness, environmental crimes have for a long time not been a field of study in criminology (Gibbs, Gore, McGarrell, & Rivers, 2010). Criminology has documented on environmental crimes and negligence, but still lacks theoretical and methodological depth and breadth (e.g. compared to street crimes) and therefore risks painting a limited picture of contemporary crimes (Halsey, 2004; South, 1998; White, 2003). In the last decade and especially in recent years, criminologists have started greening criminology and explored dimensions of environmental harm (Edwards, Edwards, & Fields, 1996; Gunningham, Norberry, & McKillop, 1995). These scholars aim to move beyond recognizing the existence of these environmental problems and also reach out for solutions and responses. In this paper, we wish to answer to the need to develop better and broader understandings of environmental crime. Scholars also stress the need for theoretical and empirical criminological research which accounts for the global or transnational nature of (environmental) harms/crimes (Franko Aas, 2007; Sheptycki & Wardak, 2005). Research on this topic should thus embrace the complexity and transnational nature which is inherent to the phenomenon. This implies the need for a broad research scope, focusing on multiple environments, disciplines, levels of analysis and actors. In this paper we therefore focus on transnational environmental crime and wish to gain insights into its governance and regulatory characteristics. By means of a literature review within the field of green, corporate and transnational criminology, and supplemented by insights from other disciplines, we aim to explore the gaps in theory and research on transnational environmental crime and its governance, and to make suggestions about how we hope to remedy those gaps in this PhD-research.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
published
subject
keyword
green criminology, transnational environmental crime
in
European Society of Criminology, 10th Annual conference, Abstracts
conference name
10th Annual conference of the European Society of Criminology : Crime and criminology : from individuals to organizations
conference location
Liège, Belgium
conference start
2010-09-08
conference end
2010-09-11
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
C3
id
1149907
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1149907
date created
2011-02-14 16:33:31
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:35:20
@inproceedings{1149907,
  abstract     = {Despite their significance and harmfulness, environmental crimes have for a long time not been a field of study in criminology (Gibbs, Gore, McGarrell, \& Rivers, 2010). Criminology has documented on environmental crimes and negligence, but still lacks theoretical and methodological depth and breadth (e.g. compared to street crimes) and therefore risks painting a limited picture of contemporary crimes (Halsey, 2004; South, 1998; White, 2003). In the last decade and especially in recent years, criminologists have started greening criminology and explored dimensions of environmental harm (Edwards, Edwards, \& Fields, 1996; Gunningham, Norberry, \& McKillop, 1995). These scholars aim to move beyond recognizing the existence of these environmental problems and also reach out for solutions and responses. In this paper, we wish to answer to the need to develop better and broader understandings of environmental crime. 
Scholars also stress the need for theoretical and empirical criminological research which accounts for the global or transnational nature of (environmental) harms/crimes (Franko Aas, 2007; Sheptycki \& Wardak, 2005). Research on this topic should thus embrace the complexity and transnational nature which is inherent to the phenomenon. This implies the need for a broad research scope, focusing on multiple environments, disciplines, levels of analysis and actors. 
In this paper we therefore focus on transnational environmental crime and wish to gain insights into its governance and regulatory characteristics. By means of a literature review within the field of green, corporate and transnational criminology, and supplemented by insights from other disciplines, we aim to explore the gaps in theory and research on transnational environmental crime and its governance, and to make suggestions about how we hope to remedy those gaps in this PhD-research.},
  author       = {Bisschop, Lieselot},
  booktitle    = {European Society of Criminology, 10th Annual conference, Abstracts},
  keyword      = {green criminology,transnational environmental crime},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Li{\`e}ge, Belgium},
  title        = {Transnational environmental crime and its governance: gaps in theory and research},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Bisschop, Lieselot. 2010. “Transnational Environmental Crime and Its Governance: Gaps in Theory and Research.” In European Society of Criminology, 10th Annual Conference, Abstracts.
APA
Bisschop, L. (2010). Transnational environmental crime and its governance: gaps in theory and research. European Society of Criminology, 10th Annual conference, Abstracts. Presented at the 10th Annual conference of the European Society of Criminology : Crime and criminology : from individuals to organizations.
Vancouver
1.
Bisschop L. Transnational environmental crime and its governance: gaps in theory and research. European Society of Criminology, 10th Annual conference, Abstracts. 2010.
MLA
Bisschop, Lieselot. “Transnational Environmental Crime and Its Governance: Gaps in Theory and Research.” European Society of Criminology, 10th Annual Conference, Abstracts. 2010. Print.