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Something more is necessary: are genes and genetic diagnostic tests statutory subject matter for US patents?

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Abstract
In a recent decision (AMP v. USPTO) from the US District Court, patent claims directed at DNA sequences corresponding to human genes and to diagnostic tests based on such genes have been found to be invalid, primarily on the basis that the DNA molecules claimed, which included cDNA, primers and probes, are 'products of nature' and are thus unpatentable. If upheld, this decision will have considerable impact on the ability of biotechnical companies and universities to patent the results of their research. In this article, we will explain the basis for this decision and discuss the appropriateness of patenting discoveries and their (obvious) uses in the light of this fascinating case. While our focus will primarily be on the product claims, diagnostic method claims were also revoked in AMP v. USPTO on the basis that they were for mental acts or did not involve any 'transformation of matter'. This will be discussed in the light of the recent US Supreme Court decision in Bilski v. Kappos, which focused on the patent-eligibility of process claims.
Keywords
patents, products of nature, genetic diagnostic tests, genes, ANTICOMMONS, TRAGEDY

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Chicago
Cockbain, Julian, and Sigrid Sterckx. 2011. “Something More Is Necessary: Are Genes and Genetic Diagnostic Tests Statutory Subject Matter for US Patents?” Expert Review of Molecular Diagnostics.
APA
Cockbain, J., & Sterckx, S. (2011). Something more is necessary: are genes and genetic diagnostic tests statutory subject matter for US patents? EXPERT REVIEW OF MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTICS.
Vancouver
1.
Cockbain J, Sterckx S. Something more is necessary: are genes and genetic diagnostic tests statutory subject matter for US patents? EXPERT REVIEW OF MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTICS. 2011. p. 149–58.
MLA
Cockbain, Julian, and Sigrid Sterckx. “Something More Is Necessary: Are Genes and Genetic Diagnostic Tests Statutory Subject Matter for US Patents?” EXPERT REVIEW OF MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTICS 2011 : 149–158. Print.
@misc{1147730,
  abstract     = {In a recent decision (AMP v. USPTO) from the US District Court, patent claims directed at DNA sequences corresponding to human genes and to diagnostic tests based on such genes have been found to be invalid, primarily on the basis that the DNA molecules claimed, which included cDNA, primers and probes, are 'products of nature' and are thus unpatentable. If upheld, this decision will have considerable impact on the ability of biotechnical companies and universities to patent the results of their research. In this article, we will explain the basis for this decision and discuss the appropriateness of patenting discoveries and their (obvious) uses in the light of this fascinating case. While our focus will primarily be on the product claims, diagnostic method claims were also revoked in AMP v. USPTO on the basis that they were for mental acts or did not involve any 'transformation of matter'. This will be discussed in the light of the recent US Supreme Court decision in Bilski v. Kappos, which focused on the patent-eligibility of process claims.},
  author       = {Cockbain, Julian and Sterckx, Sigrid},
  issn         = {1473-7159},
  keyword      = {patents,products of nature,genetic diagnostic tests,genes,ANTICOMMONS,TRAGEDY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {149--158},
  series       = {EXPERT REVIEW OF MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTICS},
  title        = {Something more is necessary: are genes and genetic diagnostic tests statutory subject matter for US patents?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/ERM.10.108},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2011},
}

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