Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

X-ray tomography to visualise concrete degradation and (self)-healing

Nele De Belie UGent, Kim Van Tittelboom UGent, B De Graef, Denis Van Loo and Veerle Cnudde UGent (2010) X-ray tomography as a multidisciplinary research tool : exploring new frontiers. p.51-56
abstract
Concrete and stone structures suffer from two major damage problems: surface degradation due to physical, chemical or microbial weathering, and crack formation. It has been estimated that in Europe, 50% of the annual construction budget is spent on rehabilitation and repair of the existing structures. Computed X-ray tomography (CT), a radiological imaging technique, can be applied to study the effect of weathering on the microstructure of the building material. This technique will show loss of material situated at the exposed surface, formation of dense layers with reaction products and changes in internal pore structure. It can also be used to visualise cracks and investigate the efficiency of crack healing applications. A relatively new research domain aims at the development of smart, self-healing materials. Autonomous self-healing implies that the material is engineered in such a way that, upon cracking, the material will sense the damage and heal the crack. In this way the original material properties, such as strength, stiffness, and impermeability, will be largely restored. High resolution CT allows to examine the distribution of capsules with healing agents in the matrix, to visualise rupture of capsules upon crack formation, and to provide 3D images of the healing material that is released into the crack which will allow to judge the crack filling efficiency.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
published
subject
keyword
degradation, concrete, X-ray microtomography, self-healing, bacteria, weathering
in
X-ray tomography as a multidisciplinary research tool : exploring new frontiers
editor
Joris Van Acker UGent, Luc Van Hoorebeke UGent, Patric Jacobs UGent, Veerle Cnudde UGent and Jan Van den Bulcke UGent
pages
51 - 56
publisher
Ghent University. Centre for X-ray Tomography (UGCT)
place of publication
Ghent, Belgium
conference name
1st UGCT seminar : X-ray tomography as a multidisciplinary research tool : exploring new frontiers
conference location
Ghent, Belgium
conference start
2010-12-08
conference end
2010-12-08
ISBN
9789080656581
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
C1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1147590
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1147590
date created
2011-02-11 14:13:47
date last changed
2017-01-02 09:52:33
@inproceedings{1147590,
  abstract     = {Concrete and stone structures suffer from two major damage problems: surface degradation due to physical, chemical or microbial weathering, and crack formation. It has been estimated that in Europe, 50\% of the annual construction budget is spent on rehabilitation and repair of the existing structures. Computed X-ray tomography (CT), a radiological imaging technique, can be applied to study the effect of weathering on the microstructure of the building material. This technique will show loss of material situated at the exposed surface, formation of dense layers with reaction products and changes in internal pore structure. It can also be used to visualise cracks and investigate the efficiency of crack healing applications. A relatively new research domain aims at the development of smart, self-healing materials. Autonomous self-healing implies that the material is engineered in such a way that, upon cracking, the material will sense the damage and heal the crack. In this way the original material properties, such as strength, stiffness, and impermeability, will be largely restored. High resolution CT allows to examine the distribution of capsules with healing agents in the matrix, to visualise rupture of capsules upon crack formation, and to provide 3D images of the healing material that is released into the crack which will allow to judge the crack filling efficiency.},
  author       = {De Belie, Nele and Van Tittelboom, Kim and De Graef, B and Van Loo, Denis and Cnudde, Veerle},
  booktitle    = {X-ray tomography as a multidisciplinary research tool : exploring new frontiers},
  editor       = {Van Acker, Joris and Van Hoorebeke, Luc and Jacobs, Patric and Cnudde, Veerle and Van den Bulcke, Jan},
  isbn         = {9789080656581},
  keyword      = {degradation,concrete,X-ray microtomography,self-healing,bacteria,weathering},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Ghent, Belgium},
  pages        = {51--56},
  publisher    = {Ghent University. Centre for X-ray Tomography (UGCT)},
  title        = {X-ray tomography to visualise concrete degradation and (self)-healing},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
De Belie, Nele, Kim Van Tittelboom, B De Graef, Denis Van Loo, and Veerle Cnudde. 2010. “X-ray Tomography to Visualise Concrete Degradation and (self)-healing.” In X-ray Tomography as a Multidisciplinary Research Tool : Exploring New Frontiers, ed. Joris Van Acker, Luc Van Hoorebeke, Patric Jacobs, Veerle Cnudde, and Jan Van den Bulcke, 51–56. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Centre for X-ray Tomography (UGCT).
APA
De Belie, Nele, Van Tittelboom, K., De Graef, B., Van Loo, D., & Cnudde, V. (2010). X-ray tomography to visualise concrete degradation and (self)-healing. In Joris Van Acker, L. Van Hoorebeke, P. Jacobs, V. Cnudde, & J. Van den Bulcke (Eds.), X-ray tomography as a multidisciplinary research tool : exploring new frontiers (pp. 51–56). Presented at the 1st UGCT seminar : X-ray tomography as a multidisciplinary research tool : exploring new frontiers, Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Centre for X-ray Tomography (UGCT).
Vancouver
1.
De Belie N, Van Tittelboom K, De Graef B, Van Loo D, Cnudde V. X-ray tomography to visualise concrete degradation and (self)-healing. In: Van Acker J, Van Hoorebeke L, Jacobs P, Cnudde V, Van den Bulcke J, editors. X-ray tomography as a multidisciplinary research tool : exploring new frontiers. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Centre for X-ray Tomography (UGCT); 2010. p. 51–6.
MLA
De Belie, Nele, Kim Van Tittelboom, B De Graef, et al. “X-ray Tomography to Visualise Concrete Degradation and (self)-healing.” X-ray Tomography as a Multidisciplinary Research Tool : Exploring New Frontiers. Ed. Joris Van Acker et al. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Centre for X-ray Tomography (UGCT), 2010. 51–56. Print.