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Being moved: valence activates approach-avoidance behavior independently of evaluation and approach-avoidance intentions

Regina Krieglmeyer, Roland Deutsch, Jan De Houwer UGent and Rudi De Raedt UGent (2010) PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE. 21(4). p.607-613
abstract
Theories from diverse areas of psychology assume that affective stimuli facilitate approach and avoidance behavior because they elicit motivational orientations that prepare the organism for appropriate responses. Recent evidence casts serious doubt on this assumption. Instead of motivational orientations, evaluative-coding mechanisms may be responsible for the effect of stimulus valence on approach-avoidance responses. Three studies tested contrasting predictions derived from these two accounts. Results supported motivational theories, as stimulus valence facilitated compatible approach-avoidance responses even though participants had no intention to approach or to avoid the stimuli, and the valence of the response labels was dissociated from the approach and avoidance movements (Study 1). Stimulus valence also facilitated compatible approach-avoidance responses when participants were not required to process the valence of the stimuli (Studies 2a and 2b). These findings are at odds with the evaluative-coding account and support the notion of a unique, automatic link between the perception of valence and approach-avoidance behavior.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
approach avoidance, evaluation, automatic, unintentional, DETERMINANTS, ATTENTION
journal title
PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE
Psychol. Sci.
volume
21
issue
4
pages
607 - 613
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000276863100026
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY, MULTIDISCIPLINARY
JCR impact factor
4.699 (2010)
JCR rank
7/120 (2010)
JCR quartile
1 (2010)
ISSN
0956-7976
DOI
10.1177/0956797610365131
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1146067
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1146067
date created
2011-02-10 17:45:00
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:45:24
@article{1146067,
  abstract     = {Theories from diverse areas of psychology assume that affective stimuli facilitate approach and avoidance behavior because they elicit motivational orientations that prepare the organism for appropriate responses. Recent evidence casts serious doubt on this assumption. Instead of motivational orientations, evaluative-coding mechanisms may be responsible for the effect of stimulus valence on approach-avoidance responses. Three studies tested contrasting predictions derived from these two accounts. Results supported motivational theories, as stimulus valence facilitated compatible approach-avoidance responses even though participants had no intention to approach or to avoid the stimuli, and the valence of the response labels was dissociated from the approach and avoidance movements (Study 1). Stimulus valence also facilitated compatible approach-avoidance responses when participants were not required to process the valence of the stimuli (Studies 2a and 2b). These findings are at odds with the evaluative-coding account and support the notion of a unique, automatic link between the perception of valence and approach-avoidance behavior.},
  author       = {Krieglmeyer, Regina and Deutsch, Roland and De Houwer, Jan and De Raedt, Rudi},
  issn         = {0956-7976},
  journal      = {PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE},
  keyword      = {approach avoidance,evaluation,automatic,unintentional,DETERMINANTS,ATTENTION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {607--613},
  title        = {Being moved: valence activates approach-avoidance behavior independently of evaluation and approach-avoidance intentions},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0956797610365131},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Krieglmeyer, Regina, Roland Deutsch, Jan De Houwer, and Rudi De Raedt. 2010. “Being Moved: Valence Activates Approach-avoidance Behavior Independently of Evaluation and Approach-avoidance Intentions.” Psychological Science 21 (4): 607–613.
APA
Krieglmeyer, R., Deutsch, R., De Houwer, J., & De Raedt, R. (2010). Being moved: valence activates approach-avoidance behavior independently of evaluation and approach-avoidance intentions. PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE, 21(4), 607–613.
Vancouver
1.
Krieglmeyer R, Deutsch R, De Houwer J, De Raedt R. Being moved: valence activates approach-avoidance behavior independently of evaluation and approach-avoidance intentions. PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE. 2010;21(4):607–13.
MLA
Krieglmeyer, Regina, Roland Deutsch, Jan De Houwer, et al. “Being Moved: Valence Activates Approach-avoidance Behavior Independently of Evaluation and Approach-avoidance Intentions.” PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE 21.4 (2010): 607–613. Print.