Advanced search
1 file | 225.45 KB

Comparison of glycopeptide-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates and glycopeptide resistance genes of human and animal origins

Author
Organization
Abstract
One hundred thirty-two glycopeptide-resistant Enterococcus faecium (GREF) isolates from different hospitals and pig and poultry farms in Belgium were compared on the basis of (i) their antibiotic susceptibilities, (ii) their SmaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns, and (iii) the organization of their Tn1546 or related elements in order to detect possible phenotypic and genotypic relationships among both groups of isolates. Human and animal vanA-positive GREF isolates were found to have similar susceptibility patterns; they remained susceptible to gentamicin and were, in general, susceptible to ampicillin. PFGE demonstrated a very high degree of genomic heterogeneity in both groups of isolates, However, indistinguishable isolates were found within different farms or hospitals, and in two instances, epidemiologically unrelated pig and human isolates showed indistinguishable PFGE patterns. In total, eight different transposon types were identified, and all were related to the prototype transposon Tn1546, The two predominant types, Tn1546 and type 2 transposons, which differed at three band positions, were present in both human and animal isolates, Type 2 transposons were significantly associated with pig isolates. The other types were seldom detected. These data suggest a possible exchange of glycopeptide resistance markers between animals and humans.
Keywords
GENOMIC DNA, UNITED-STATES, VANCOMYCIN RESISTANCE, HOSPITALIZED-PATIENTS, MOLECULAR ANALYSIS, FARM-ANIMALS, COMMUNITY, SUSCEPTIBILITY, ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE, FIELD GEL-ELECTROPHORESIS

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 225.45 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Descheemaeker, Patrick, Sabine Chapelle, Luc Devriese, Patrick Butaye, Peter Vandamme, and Herman Goossens. 1999. “Comparison of Glycopeptide-resistant Enterococcus Faecium Isolates and Glycopeptide Resistance Genes of Human and Animal Origins.” Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 43 (8): 2032–2037.
APA
Descheemaeker, P., Chapelle, S., Devriese, L., Butaye, P., Vandamme, P., & Goossens, H. (1999). Comparison of glycopeptide-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates and glycopeptide resistance genes of human and animal origins. ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS AND CHEMOTHERAPY, 43(8), 2032–2037.
Vancouver
1.
Descheemaeker P, Chapelle S, Devriese L, Butaye P, Vandamme P, Goossens H. Comparison of glycopeptide-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates and glycopeptide resistance genes of human and animal origins. ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS AND CHEMOTHERAPY. 1999;43(8):2032–7.
MLA
Descheemaeker, Patrick, Sabine Chapelle, Luc Devriese, et al. “Comparison of Glycopeptide-resistant Enterococcus Faecium Isolates and Glycopeptide Resistance Genes of Human and Animal Origins.” ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS AND CHEMOTHERAPY 43.8 (1999): 2032–2037. Print.
@article{112920,
  abstract     = {One hundred thirty-two glycopeptide-resistant Enterococcus faecium (GREF) isolates from different hospitals and pig and poultry farms in Belgium were compared on the basis of (i) their antibiotic susceptibilities, (ii) their SmaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns, and (iii) the organization of their Tn1546 or related elements in order to detect possible phenotypic and genotypic relationships among both groups of isolates. Human and animal vanA-positive GREF isolates were found to have similar susceptibility patterns; they remained susceptible to gentamicin and were, in general, susceptible to ampicillin. PFGE demonstrated a very high degree of genomic heterogeneity in both groups of isolates, However, indistinguishable isolates were found within different farms or hospitals, and in two instances, epidemiologically unrelated pig and human isolates showed indistinguishable PFGE patterns. In total, eight different transposon types were identified, and all were related to the prototype transposon Tn1546, The two predominant types, Tn1546 and type 2 transposons, which differed at three band positions, were present in both human and animal isolates, Type 2 transposons were significantly associated with pig isolates. The other types were seldom detected. These data suggest a possible exchange of glycopeptide resistance markers between animals and humans.},
  author       = {Descheemaeker, Patrick and Chapelle, Sabine and Devriese, Luc and Butaye, Patrick and Vandamme, Peter and Goossens, Herman},
  issn         = {0066-4804},
  journal      = {ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS AND CHEMOTHERAPY},
  keyword      = {GENOMIC DNA,UNITED-STATES,VANCOMYCIN RESISTANCE,HOSPITALIZED-PATIENTS,MOLECULAR ANALYSIS,FARM-ANIMALS,COMMUNITY,SUSCEPTIBILITY,ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE,FIELD GEL-ELECTROPHORESIS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {2032--2037},
  title        = {Comparison of glycopeptide-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates and glycopeptide resistance genes of human and animal origins},
  url          = {http://aac.asm.org/cgi/content/abstract/43/8/2032},
  volume       = {43},
  year         = {1999},
}

Web of Science
Times cited: