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Transgenic tobacco plants with reduced capability to detoxify reactive oxygen intermediates are hyperresponsive to pathogen infection

Ron Mittler, Elza Hallak Herr, Bjorn Larus Orvar, Wim Van Camp UGent, Hilde Willekens UGent, Dirk Inzé UGent and Brian E Ellis (1999) PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 96(24). p.14165-14170
abstract
Reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) play a critical role in the defense of plants against invading pathogens. Produced during the "oxidative burst," they are thought to activate programmed cell death (PCD) and induce antimicrobial defenses such as pathogenesis-related proteins. It was shown recently that during the interaction of plants with pathogens, the expression of ROI-detoxifying enzymes such as ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and catalase (CAT) is suppressed, It was suggested that this suppression, occurring upon pathogen recognition and coinciding with an enhanced rate of ROI production, plays a key role in elevating cellular ROI levels, thereby potentiating the induction of PCD and other defenses, To examine the relationship between the suppression of antioxidative mechanisms and the induction of PCD and other defenses during pathogen attack, we studied the interaction between transgenic antisense tobacco plants with reduced APX or CAT and a bacterial pathogen that triggers the hypersensitive response. Transgenic plants with reduced capability to detoxify ROI (i,e,, antisense APX or CAT) were found to be hyperresponsive to pathogen attack. They activated PCD in response to low amounts of pathogens that did not trigger the activation of PCD in control plants. Our findings support the hypothesis that suppression of ROI-scavenging enzymes during the hypersensitive response prays an important role in enhancing pathogen-induced PCD.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
CYTOSOLIC ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE, PROGRAMMED CELL-DEATH, SYSTEMIC ACQUIRED-RESISTANCE, SALICYLIC-ACID, ACTIVE OXYGEN, DISEASE RESISTANCE, DEFENSE RESPONSES, INHIBITION, CATALASE, H2O2
journal title
PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA
volume
96
issue
24
pages
14165 - 14170
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000083872900102
ISSN
0027-8424
DOI
10.1073/pnas.96.24.14165
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
112697
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-112697
date created
2004-01-14 13:35:00
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:36:51
@article{112697,
  abstract     = {Reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) play a critical role in the defense of plants against invading pathogens. Produced during the {\textacutedbl}oxidative burst,{\textacutedbl} they are thought to activate programmed cell death (PCD) and induce antimicrobial defenses such as pathogenesis-related proteins. It was shown recently that during the interaction of plants with pathogens, the expression of ROI-detoxifying enzymes such as ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and catalase (CAT) is suppressed, It was suggested that this suppression, occurring upon pathogen recognition and coinciding with an enhanced rate of ROI production, plays a key role in elevating cellular ROI levels, thereby potentiating the induction of PCD and other defenses, To examine the relationship between the suppression of antioxidative mechanisms and the induction of PCD and other defenses during pathogen attack, we studied the interaction between transgenic antisense tobacco plants with reduced APX or CAT and a bacterial pathogen that triggers the hypersensitive response. Transgenic plants with reduced capability to detoxify ROI (i,e,, antisense APX or CAT) were found to be hyperresponsive to pathogen attack. They activated PCD in response to low amounts of pathogens that did not trigger the activation of PCD in control plants. Our findings support the hypothesis that suppression of ROI-scavenging enzymes during the hypersensitive response prays an important role in enhancing pathogen-induced PCD.},
  author       = {Mittler, Ron and Herr, Elza Hallak and Orvar, Bjorn Larus and Van Camp, Wim and Willekens, Hilde and Inz{\'e}, Dirk and Ellis, Brian E},
  issn         = {0027-8424},
  journal      = {PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA},
  keyword      = {CYTOSOLIC ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE,PROGRAMMED CELL-DEATH,SYSTEMIC ACQUIRED-RESISTANCE,SALICYLIC-ACID,ACTIVE OXYGEN,DISEASE RESISTANCE,DEFENSE RESPONSES,INHIBITION,CATALASE,H2O2},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {24},
  pages        = {14165--14170},
  title        = {Transgenic tobacco plants with reduced capability to detoxify reactive oxygen intermediates are hyperresponsive to pathogen infection},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.96.24.14165},
  volume       = {96},
  year         = {1999},
}

Chicago
Mittler, Ron, Elza Hallak Herr, Bjorn Larus Orvar, Wim Van Camp, Hilde Willekens, Dirk Inzé, and Brian E Ellis. 1999. “Transgenic Tobacco Plants with Reduced Capability to Detoxify Reactive Oxygen Intermediates Are Hyperresponsive to Pathogen Infection.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 96 (24): 14165–14170.
APA
Mittler, R., Herr, E. H., Orvar, B. L., Van Camp, W., Willekens, H., Inzé, D., & Ellis, B. E. (1999). Transgenic tobacco plants with reduced capability to detoxify reactive oxygen intermediates are hyperresponsive to pathogen infection. PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, 96(24), 14165–14170.
Vancouver
1.
Mittler R, Herr EH, Orvar BL, Van Camp W, Willekens H, Inzé D, et al. Transgenic tobacco plants with reduced capability to detoxify reactive oxygen intermediates are hyperresponsive to pathogen infection. PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 1999;96(24):14165–70.
MLA
Mittler, Ron, Elza Hallak Herr, Bjorn Larus Orvar, et al. “Transgenic Tobacco Plants with Reduced Capability to Detoxify Reactive Oxygen Intermediates Are Hyperresponsive to Pathogen Infection.” PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 96.24 (1999): 14165–14170. Print.