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Fostering deaf people's empowerment: the Cameroonian deaf community and epistemological equity

Goedele De Clerck (2011) THIRD WORLD QUARTERLY. 32(8). p.1419-1436
abstract
From its beginnings deaf studies has acknowledged that deaf people have their own ways of learning, knowing and viewing the world. A recently emergent culturally sensitive line aims to document indigenous sign languages and deaf cultural patterns in non-Western contexts. Employing the concept of deaf (indigenous) epistemologies as an analytical tool enhances insight into the diverse lives and experiences of deaf people both as individuals and as members of a community. This concept is explored through its application to a case study of emancipation processes in the deaf community in Cameroon. The challenges of an ongoing research process, a participatory and community-based approach, and the valuing of deaf indigenous knowledge in research are presented. These challenges also included negotiation of research findings and exposure of the Cameroonian deaf community to deaf indigenous knowledge on a broader scale in a way that fostered the community's empowerment and ownership of the present study.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
journal title
THIRD WORLD QUARTERLY
Third World Q.
volume
32
issue
8
issue title
Disability in the Global South: Beyond Northern Epistemologies
pages
1419 - 1436
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000299218200004
JCR category
PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT
JCR impact factor
0.705 (2011)
JCR rank
34/54 (2011)
JCR quartile
3 (2011)
ISSN
0143-6597
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1114785
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1114785
date created
2011-02-02 11:04:34
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:45:26
@article{1114785,
  abstract     = {From its beginnings deaf studies has acknowledged that deaf people have their own ways of learning, knowing and viewing the world. A recently emergent culturally sensitive line aims to document indigenous sign languages and deaf cultural patterns in non-Western contexts. Employing the concept of deaf (indigenous) epistemologies as an analytical tool enhances insight into the diverse lives and experiences of deaf people both as individuals and as members of a community. This concept is explored through its application to a case study of emancipation processes in the deaf community in Cameroon. The challenges of an ongoing research process, a participatory and community-based approach, and the valuing of deaf indigenous knowledge in research are presented. These challenges also included negotiation of research findings and exposure of the Cameroonian deaf community to deaf indigenous knowledge on a broader scale in a way that fostered the community's empowerment and ownership of the present study.},
  author       = {De Clerck, Goedele},
  issn         = {0143-6597},
  journal      = {THIRD WORLD QUARTERLY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {1419--1436},
  title        = {Fostering deaf people's empowerment: the Cameroonian deaf community and epistemological equity},
  volume       = {32},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
De Clerck, Goedele. 2011. “Fostering Deaf People’s Empowerment: The Cameroonian Deaf Community and Epistemological Equity.” Third World Quarterly 32 (8): 1419–1436.
APA
De Clerck, G. (2011). Fostering deaf people’s empowerment: the Cameroonian deaf community and epistemological equity. THIRD WORLD QUARTERLY, 32(8), 1419–1436.
Vancouver
1.
De Clerck G. Fostering deaf people’s empowerment: the Cameroonian deaf community and epistemological equity. THIRD WORLD QUARTERLY. 2011;32(8):1419–36.
MLA
De Clerck, Goedele. “Fostering Deaf People’s Empowerment: The Cameroonian Deaf Community and Epistemological Equity.” THIRD WORLD QUARTERLY 32.8 (2011): 1419–1436. Print.