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Where do I belong? Volunteer attachment in a complex organization

Lesley Hustinx UGent and Femida Handy (2009) ADMINISTRATION IN SOCIAL WORK. 33(2). p.202-220
abstract
To understand volunteer retention and recruitment in complex organizations, this paper focuses on volunteers' attachment to a multipurpose and multi-branch organization. Using the Red Cross in Flanders (Belgium), a service organization with multiple locations offering a variety of programs, we investigate whether volunteers' attachment is primarily directed toward the organization as a whole, or whether volunteers are more prone to develop localized attachment to the program or branch in which they participate. Our findings suggest that managers recruiting volunteers to large complex organizations should be cautious in using the overarching organizational mission to attract volunteers. Rather, attention should be put on specific programs and activities using volunteers. It is only through longer-term service that volunteers appreciate the organization's mission and principles and find their allegiance to the organization as a whole.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
volunteer attachment, volunteer loyalty, volunteer management, organizational complexity, Red Cross, COMMUNITY
journal title
ADMINISTRATION IN SOCIAL WORK
Adm. Soc. Work
volume
33
issue
2
pages
202 - 220
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000265830700006
JCR category
SOCIAL WORK
JCR impact factor
0.512 (2009)
JCR rank
20/32 (2009)
JCR quartile
3 (2009)
ISSN
0364-3107
DOI
10.1080/03643100902769129
language
English
UGent publication?
no
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1114188
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1114188
date created
2011-02-01 15:59:52
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:46:05
@article{1114188,
  abstract     = {To understand volunteer retention and recruitment in complex organizations, this paper focuses on volunteers' attachment to a multipurpose and multi-branch organization. Using the Red Cross in Flanders (Belgium), a service organization with multiple locations offering a variety of programs, we investigate whether volunteers' attachment is primarily directed toward the organization as a whole, or whether volunteers are more prone to develop localized attachment to the program or branch in which they participate. Our findings suggest that managers recruiting volunteers to large complex organizations should be cautious in using the overarching organizational mission to attract volunteers. Rather, attention should be put on specific programs and activities using volunteers. It is only through longer-term service that volunteers appreciate the organization's mission and principles and find their allegiance to the organization as a whole.},
  author       = {Hustinx, Lesley and Handy, Femida},
  issn         = {0364-3107},
  journal      = {ADMINISTRATION IN SOCIAL WORK},
  keyword      = {volunteer attachment,volunteer loyalty,volunteer management,organizational complexity,Red Cross,COMMUNITY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {202--220},
  title        = {Where do I belong? Volunteer attachment in a complex organization},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03643100902769129},
  volume       = {33},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Hustinx, Lesley, and Femida Handy. 2009. “Where Do I Belong? Volunteer Attachment in a Complex Organization.” Administration in Social Work 33 (2): 202–220.
APA
Hustinx, L., & Handy, F. (2009). Where do I belong? Volunteer attachment in a complex organization. ADMINISTRATION IN SOCIAL WORK, 33(2), 202–220.
Vancouver
1.
Hustinx L, Handy F. Where do I belong? Volunteer attachment in a complex organization. ADMINISTRATION IN SOCIAL WORK. 2009;33(2):202–20.
MLA
Hustinx, Lesley, and Femida Handy. “Where Do I Belong? Volunteer Attachment in a Complex Organization.” ADMINISTRATION IN SOCIAL WORK 33.2 (2009): 202–220. Print.