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Social and cultural origins of motivations to volunteer a comparison of university students in six countries

(2010) INTERNATIONAL SOCIOLOGY. 25(3). p.349-382
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Abstract
Although participation in volunteering and motivations to volunteer (MTV) have received substantial attention on the national level, particularly in the US, few studies have compared and explained these issues across cultural and political contexts. This study compares how two theoretical perspectives, social origins theory and signalling theory, explain variations in MTV across different countries. The study analyses responses from a sample of 5794 students from six countries representing distinct institutional contexts. The findings provide strong support for signalling theory but less so for social origins theory. The article concludes that volunteering is a personal decision and thus is influenced more at the individual level but is also impacted to some degree by macro-level societal forces.
Keywords
exchange benefits, cross-national analysis, motivations, non-profit regimes, signalling theory, social origins theory, university students, volunteering, PARTICIPATION, STUDENT, COUNTRIES, MOTIVES, CANADA, MARKET, WORK

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Chicago
Hustinx, Lesley, Femida Handy, Ram A Cnaan, Jeffrey L Brudney, Anne Birgitta Pessi, and Naoto Yamauchi. 2010. “Social and Cultural Origins of Motivations to Volunteer a Comparison of University Students in Six Countries.” International Sociology 25 (3): 349–382.
APA
Hustinx, L., Handy, F., Cnaan, R. A., Brudney, J. L., Pessi, A. B., & Yamauchi, N. (2010). Social and cultural origins of motivations to volunteer a comparison of university students in six countries. INTERNATIONAL SOCIOLOGY, 25(3), 349–382.
Vancouver
1.
Hustinx L, Handy F, Cnaan RA, Brudney JL, Pessi AB, Yamauchi N. Social and cultural origins of motivations to volunteer a comparison of university students in six countries. INTERNATIONAL SOCIOLOGY. 2010;25(3):349–82.
MLA
Hustinx, Lesley, Femida Handy, Ram A Cnaan, et al. “Social and Cultural Origins of Motivations to Volunteer a Comparison of University Students in Six Countries.” INTERNATIONAL SOCIOLOGY 25.3 (2010): 349–382. Print.
@article{1114161,
  abstract     = {Although participation in volunteering and motivations to volunteer (MTV) have received substantial attention on the national level, particularly in the US, few studies have compared and explained these issues across cultural and political contexts. This study compares how two theoretical perspectives, social origins theory and signalling theory, explain variations in MTV across different countries. The study analyses responses from a sample of 5794 students from six countries representing distinct institutional contexts. The findings provide strong support for signalling theory but less so for social origins theory. The article concludes that volunteering is a personal decision and thus is influenced more at the individual level but is also impacted to some degree by macro-level societal forces.},
  author       = {Hustinx, Lesley and Handy, Femida and Cnaan, Ram A and Brudney, Jeffrey L and Pessi, Anne Birgitta and Yamauchi, Naoto},
  issn         = {0268-5809},
  journal      = {INTERNATIONAL SOCIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {exchange benefits,cross-national analysis,motivations,non-profit regimes,signalling theory,social origins theory,university students,volunteering,PARTICIPATION,STUDENT,COUNTRIES,MOTIVES,CANADA,MARKET,WORK},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {349--382},
  title        = {Social and cultural origins of motivations to volunteer a comparison of university students in six countries},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0268580909360297},
  volume       = {25},
  year         = {2010},
}

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