Advanced search
1 file | 163.69 KB Add to list

Linking credentialed skills, social class, working conditions and self-reported health: a focus on health inequality-generating mechanisms

(2010) SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH & ILLNESS. 32(6). p.948-964
Author
Organization
Abstract
In this study, focus is on the mechanisms linking credentialed skills and social class relations to five dimensions of occupational stressors and three self-reported health outcomes: persistent fatigue, musculoskeletal complaints and emotional wellbeing. We test for direct health associations of skills/class. Moreover, indirect health associations of skills/class, through differential exposure to occupational stressors and effect modifications of the occupational stressors, are tested. A modified LISREL analysis is applied to a representative cross-sectional sample of 11,099 Flemish wage-earners. The direct health effects of credentialed skills/class are limited, but they are clearly indirectly related to the self-reported health outcomes through differential exposure to occupational stressors. The indirect mechanisms point to both reinforcing and moderating effects on socio-economic health inequalities. Two cases of effect modification are also observed: social class modifying the association between control and persistent fatigue; and skills affecting the association between the quality of social relations and emotional wellbeing. Differential exposure to occupational stressors is a crucial mechanism linking skills/class to socio-economic health inequalities. Direct effects and effect modification of class/skills are relevant, but of limited importance. One of the effect modifications found suggests that a specific focus on contradictory class positions might be warranted in future research.
Keywords
modified LISREL, occupational stress, Belgium, social class, socio-economic health inequalities, CONTROL-SUPPORT-MODEL, REPRESENTATIVE SAMPLE, EDUCATIONAL-LEVEL, MENTAL-HEALTH, POPULATION, STRESS, DEMAND, STRATIFICATION, PREVALENCE, DISTRESS

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 163.69 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Vanroelen, Christophe, Katia Levecque, Guy Moors, et al. “Linking Credentialed Skills, Social Class, Working Conditions and Self-reported Health: a Focus on Health Inequality-generating Mechanisms.” SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH & ILLNESS 32.6 (2010): 948–964. Print.
APA
Vanroelen, C., Levecque, K., Moors, G., & Louckx, F. (2010). Linking credentialed skills, social class, working conditions and self-reported health: a focus on health inequality-generating mechanisms. SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH & ILLNESS, 32(6), 948–964.
Chicago author-date
Vanroelen, Christophe, Katia Levecque, Guy Moors, and Fred Louckx. 2010. “Linking Credentialed Skills, Social Class, Working Conditions and Self-reported Health: a Focus on Health Inequality-generating Mechanisms.” Sociology of Health & Illness 32 (6): 948–964.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Vanroelen, Christophe, Katia Levecque, Guy Moors, and Fred Louckx. 2010. “Linking Credentialed Skills, Social Class, Working Conditions and Self-reported Health: a Focus on Health Inequality-generating Mechanisms.” Sociology of Health & Illness 32 (6): 948–964.
Vancouver
1.
Vanroelen C, Levecque K, Moors G, Louckx F. Linking credentialed skills, social class, working conditions and self-reported health: a focus on health inequality-generating mechanisms. SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH & ILLNESS. 2010;32(6):948–64.
IEEE
[1]
C. Vanroelen, K. Levecque, G. Moors, and F. Louckx, “Linking credentialed skills, social class, working conditions and self-reported health: a focus on health inequality-generating mechanisms,” SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH & ILLNESS, vol. 32, no. 6, pp. 948–964, 2010.
@article{1113962,
  abstract     = {{In this study, focus is on the mechanisms linking credentialed skills and social class relations to five dimensions of occupational stressors and three self-reported health outcomes: persistent fatigue, musculoskeletal complaints and emotional wellbeing. We test for direct health associations of skills/class. Moreover, indirect health associations of skills/class, through differential exposure to occupational stressors and effect modifications of the occupational stressors, are tested. A modified LISREL analysis is applied to a representative cross-sectional sample of 11,099 Flemish wage-earners. The direct health effects of credentialed skills/class are limited, but they are clearly indirectly related to the self-reported health outcomes through differential exposure to occupational stressors. The indirect mechanisms point to both reinforcing and moderating effects on socio-economic health inequalities. Two cases of effect modification are also observed: social class modifying the association between control and persistent fatigue; and skills affecting the association between the quality of social relations and emotional wellbeing. Differential exposure to occupational stressors is a crucial mechanism linking skills/class to socio-economic health inequalities. Direct effects and effect modification of class/skills are relevant, but of limited importance. One of the effect modifications found suggests that a specific focus on contradictory class positions might be warranted in future research.}},
  author       = {{Vanroelen, Christophe and Levecque, Katia and Moors, Guy and Louckx, Fred}},
  issn         = {{0141-9889}},
  journal      = {{SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH & ILLNESS}},
  keywords     = {{modified LISREL,occupational stress,Belgium,social class,socio-economic health inequalities,CONTROL-SUPPORT-MODEL,REPRESENTATIVE SAMPLE,EDUCATIONAL-LEVEL,MENTAL-HEALTH,POPULATION,STRESS,DEMAND,STRATIFICATION,PREVALENCE,DISTRESS}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{6}},
  pages        = {{948--964}},
  title        = {{Linking credentialed skills, social class, working conditions and self-reported health: a focus on health inequality-generating mechanisms}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9566.2010.01260.x}},
  volume       = {{32}},
  year         = {{2010}},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: