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Human faecal microbiota display variable patterns of glycerol metabolism

Rosemarie De Weirdt UGent, Sam Possemiers UGent, Griet Vermeulen UGent, Tanja CW Moerdijk-Poortvliet, Henricus TS Boschker, Willy Verstraete UGent and Tom Van de Wiele UGent (2010) FEMS MICROBIOLOGY ECOLOGY. 74(3). p.601-611
abstract
Significant amounts of glycerol reach the colon microbiota daily through the diet and/or by in situ microbial production or release from desquamated epithelial cells. Some gut microorganisms may anaerobically reduce glycerol to 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO), with 3-hydroxypropanal as an intermediate. Accumulation of the latter intermediate may result in the formation of reuterin, which is known for its biological activity (e.g. antimicrobial properties). To date, glycerol metabolism in mixed cultures from the human colon has received little attention. Using in vitro batch incubations of faeces from 10 human individuals, we demonstrated that glycerol addition (140 mM) significantly affects the metabolism and composition of the microbial community. About a third of the samples exhibited rapid glycerol conversion, yielding proportionally higher levels of acetate and 1,3-PDO. In contrast, a slower glycerol metabolism resulted in higher levels of propionate. Furthermore, rapid glycerol metabolism correlated with significant shifts in the Lactobacillus-Enterococcus community, which were not observed in slower glycerol-metabolizing samples. As the conversion of glycerol to 1,3-PDO is a highly reducing process, we infer that the glycerol metabolism may act as an effective hydrogen sink. Given the importance of hydrogen-consuming processes in the gut, this work suggests that glycerol may have potential as a tool for modulating fermentation kinetics and profiles in the gastrointestinal tract.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
DIETARY FACTORS, PRODUCER PHENOTYPE, SMALL-INTESTINE, 3-HYDROXYPROPIONALDEHYDE, FERMENTATION, LACTOBACILLUS-REUTERI, CANCER CELL-LINE, RATIO MASS-SPECTROMETRY, LACTIC-ACID BACTERIA, CARRIER-MEDIATED TRANSPORT
journal title
FEMS MICROBIOLOGY ECOLOGY
FEMS Microbiol. Ecol.
volume
74
issue
3
pages
601 - 611
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000284072900011
JCR category
MICROBIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
3.456 (2010)
JCR rank
27/103 (2010)
JCR quartile
2 (2010)
ISSN
0168-6496
DOI
10.1111/j.1574-6941.2010.00974.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1108004
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1108004
date created
2011-01-21 14:12:14
date last changed
2011-01-25 12:31:21
@article{1108004,
  abstract     = {Significant amounts of glycerol reach the colon microbiota daily through the diet and/or by in situ microbial production or release from desquamated epithelial cells. Some gut microorganisms may anaerobically reduce glycerol to 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO), with 3-hydroxypropanal as an intermediate. Accumulation of the latter intermediate may result in the formation of reuterin, which is known for its biological activity (e.g. antimicrobial properties). To date, glycerol metabolism in mixed cultures from the human colon has received little attention. Using in vitro batch incubations of faeces from 10 human individuals, we demonstrated that glycerol addition (140 mM) significantly affects the metabolism and composition of the microbial community. About a third of the samples exhibited rapid glycerol conversion, yielding proportionally higher levels of acetate and 1,3-PDO. In contrast, a slower glycerol metabolism resulted in higher levels of propionate. Furthermore, rapid glycerol metabolism correlated with significant shifts in the Lactobacillus-Enterococcus community, which were not observed in slower glycerol-metabolizing samples. As the conversion of glycerol to 1,3-PDO is a highly reducing process, we infer that the glycerol metabolism may act as an effective hydrogen sink. Given the importance of hydrogen-consuming processes in the gut, this work suggests that glycerol may have potential as a tool for modulating fermentation kinetics and profiles in the gastrointestinal tract.},
  author       = {De Weirdt, Rosemarie and Possemiers, Sam and Vermeulen, Griet and Moerdijk-Poortvliet, Tanja CW and Boschker, Henricus TS and Verstraete, Willy and Van de Wiele, Tom},
  issn         = {0168-6496},
  journal      = {FEMS MICROBIOLOGY ECOLOGY},
  keyword      = {DIETARY FACTORS,PRODUCER PHENOTYPE,SMALL-INTESTINE,3-HYDROXYPROPIONALDEHYDE,FERMENTATION,LACTOBACILLUS-REUTERI,CANCER CELL-LINE,RATIO MASS-SPECTROMETRY,LACTIC-ACID BACTERIA,CARRIER-MEDIATED TRANSPORT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {601--611},
  title        = {Human faecal microbiota display variable patterns of glycerol metabolism},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1574-6941.2010.00974.x},
  volume       = {74},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
De Weirdt, Rosemarie, Sam Possemiers, Griet Vermeulen, Tanja CW Moerdijk-Poortvliet, Henricus TS Boschker, Willy Verstraete, and Tom Van de Wiele. 2010. “Human Faecal Microbiota Display Variable Patterns of Glycerol Metabolism.” Fems Microbiology Ecology 74 (3): 601–611.
APA
De Weirdt, R., Possemiers, S., Vermeulen, G., Moerdijk-Poortvliet, T. C., Boschker, H. T., Verstraete, W., & Van de Wiele, T. (2010). Human faecal microbiota display variable patterns of glycerol metabolism. FEMS MICROBIOLOGY ECOLOGY, 74(3), 601–611.
Vancouver
1.
De Weirdt R, Possemiers S, Vermeulen G, Moerdijk-Poortvliet TC, Boschker HT, Verstraete W, et al. Human faecal microbiota display variable patterns of glycerol metabolism. FEMS MICROBIOLOGY ECOLOGY. 2010;74(3):601–11.
MLA
De Weirdt, Rosemarie, Sam Possemiers, Griet Vermeulen, et al. “Human Faecal Microbiota Display Variable Patterns of Glycerol Metabolism.” FEMS MICROBIOLOGY ECOLOGY 74.3 (2010): 601–611. Print.