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Perceived participation, experiences from persons with spinal cord injury in their transition period from hospital to home

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Abstract
Objective: It is suggested that participation should be achieved at the end of the rehabilitation process. However, there is a lack of consensus on the definition, the conceptualisation and the measurement of participation. This study aims to add to the existing body of knowledge of participation by exploring the ‘person perceived participation’ in individuals with Spinal Cord Injury. Design: Based on the ‘grounded theory’ approach; in-depth, semi structured interviews were conducted with 11 SCI patients from a rehabilitation cohort in their transition period from hospital to home, in order to gain an insider perspective on the concept of participation. Results: Results identified three different categories of participation; social participation, occupational participation and socio-occupational participation. The participants conceptualize participation as a set of values, including experiencing free choice to perform activities, performing according to the person’s identity, experiencing personal growth, belonging by experiencing trust and security, feeling validated, having a sense of control, experiencing a sense of importance and finding equal identities. Conclusion: From a client perspective; participation is as a complex, multidimensional construct and can be considered as a dyad between the individual’s social interactions and his specific activities performed. Participation was not experienced by the SCI patients as an objective way of performing activities within a societal context or as frequencies of activities performed, but rather as an internal process of negotiation that appeared to be based on balancing personal and societal values.
Keywords
spinal cord injury, transition, participation, grounded theory, INTERNATIONAL-CLASSIFICATION, PEOPLE, REHABILITATION, SATISFACTION, PERSPECTIVE, AUTONOMY, TRENDS, ICF, DISABILITY-AND-HEALTH, QUALITY-OF-LIFE, activity

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Chicago
Van de Velde, Dominique, Piet Bracke, Geert Van Hove, Staffan Josephsson, and Guy Vanderstraeten. 2010. “Perceived Participation, Experiences from Persons with Spinal Cord Injury in Their Transition Period from Hospital to Home.” Ed. Črt Marinček. International Journal of Rehabilitation Research 33 (4): 346–355.
APA
Van de Velde, Dominique, Bracke, P., Van Hove, G., Josephsson, S., & Vanderstraeten, G. (2010). Perceived participation, experiences from persons with spinal cord injury in their transition period from hospital to home. (Č. Marinček, Ed.)INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF REHABILITATION RESEARCH, 33(4), 346–355.
Vancouver
1.
Van de Velde D, Bracke P, Van Hove G, Josephsson S, Vanderstraeten G. Perceived participation, experiences from persons with spinal cord injury in their transition period from hospital to home. Marinček Č, editor. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF REHABILITATION RESEARCH. 2010;33(4):346–55.
MLA
Van de Velde, Dominique, Piet Bracke, Geert Van Hove, et al. “Perceived Participation, Experiences from Persons with Spinal Cord Injury in Their Transition Period from Hospital to Home.” Ed. Črt Marinček. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF REHABILITATION RESEARCH 33.4 (2010): 346–355. Print.
@article{1105353,
  abstract     = {Objective: It is suggested that participation should be achieved at the end of the rehabilitation process. However, there is a lack of consensus on the definition, the conceptualisation and the measurement of participation. This study aims to add to the existing body of knowledge of participation by exploring the {\textquoteleft}person perceived participation{\textquoteright} in individuals with  Spinal Cord Injury.
Design: Based on the {\textquoteleft}grounded theory{\textquoteright} approach; in-depth, semi structured interviews were conducted with 11 SCI patients from a rehabilitation cohort in their transition period from hospital to home, in order to gain an insider perspective on the concept of participation. 
Results: Results identified three different categories of participation; social participation, occupational participation and socio-occupational participation. The participants conceptualize participation as a set of values, including experiencing free choice to perform activities, performing according to the person{\textquoteright}s identity, experiencing personal growth, belonging by experiencing trust and security, feeling validated, having a sense of control, experiencing a sense of importance and finding equal identities.
Conclusion: From a client perspective; participation is as a complex, multidimensional construct and can be considered as a dyad between the individual{\textquoteright}s social interactions and his specific activities performed. Participation was not experienced by the SCI patients as an objective way of performing activities within a societal context or as frequencies of activities performed, but rather as an internal process of negotiation that appeared to be based on balancing personal and societal values.},
  author       = {Van de Velde, Dominique and Bracke, Piet and Van Hove, Geert and Josephsson, Staffan and Vanderstraeten, Guy},
  editor       = {Marin\v{c}ek, \v{C}rt },
  issn         = {0342-5282},
  journal      = {INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF REHABILITATION RESEARCH},
  keyword      = {spinal cord injury,transition,participation,grounded theory,INTERNATIONAL-CLASSIFICATION,PEOPLE,REHABILITATION,SATISFACTION,PERSPECTIVE,AUTONOMY,TRENDS,ICF,DISABILITY-AND-HEALTH,QUALITY-OF-LIFE,activity},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {346--355},
  title        = {Perceived participation, experiences from persons with spinal cord injury in their transition period from hospital to home},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MRR.0b013e32833cdf2a},
  volume       = {33},
  year         = {2010},
}

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