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Neural correlates of emotional synchrony

Simone Kühn UGent, Barbara CN Müller, Andries van der Leij, Ap Dijksterhuis, Marcel Brass UGent and Rick B van Baaren (2011) SOCIAL COGNITIVE AND AFFECTIVE NEUROSCIENCE. 6(3). p.368-374
abstract
Facial expressions can trigger emotions: when we smile we feel happy, when we frown we feel sad. However, the mimicry literature also shows that we feel happy when our interaction partner behaves the way we do. Thus what happens if we express our sadness and we perceive somebody who is imitating us? In the current study, participants were presented with either happy or sad faces, while expressing one of these emotions themselves. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging was used to measure neural responses on trials where the observed emotion was either congruent or incongruent with the expressed emotion. Our results indicate that being in a congruent emotional state, irrespective of the emotion, activates the medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), brain areas that have been associated with positive feelings and reward processing. However, incongruent emotional states activated the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) as well as posterior superior temporal gyrus/sulcus (STG), both playing a role in conflict processing.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
ATTENTION, METAANALYSIS, FMRI, PERCEPTION, FACIAL EXPRESSIONS, HUMAN BRAIN, SOCIAL COGNITION, ANTERIOR CINGULATE CORTEX, fMRI, social neuroscience, imitation, mimicry, SELF, RESPONSES
journal title
SOCIAL COGNITIVE AND AFFECTIVE NEUROSCIENCE
Soc. Cogn. Affect. Neurosci.
volume
6
issue
3
pages
368 - 374
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000291543600014
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY, EXPERIMENTAL
JCR impact factor
6.132 (2011)
JCR rank
2/83 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
1749-5016
DOI
10.1093/scan/nsq044
project
The integrative neuroscience of behavioral control (Neuroscience)
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
VABB id
c:vabb:301396
VABB type
VABB-1
id
1100877
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1100877
date created
2011-01-15 18:30:08
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:46:18
@article{1100877,
  abstract     = {Facial expressions can trigger emotions: when we smile we feel happy, when we frown we feel sad. However, the mimicry literature also shows that we feel happy when our interaction partner behaves the way we do. Thus what happens if we express our sadness and we perceive somebody who is imitating us? In the current study, participants were presented with either happy or sad faces, while expressing one of these emotions themselves. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging was used to measure neural responses on trials where the observed emotion was either congruent or incongruent with the expressed emotion. Our results indicate that being in a congruent emotional state, irrespective of the emotion, activates the medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), brain areas that have been associated with positive feelings and reward processing. However, incongruent emotional states activated the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) as well as posterior superior temporal gyrus/sulcus (STG), both playing a role in conflict processing.},
  author       = {K{\"u}hn, Simone and M{\"u}ller, Barbara CN and van der Leij, Andries and Dijksterhuis, Ap and Brass, Marcel and van Baaren, Rick B},
  issn         = {1749-5016},
  journal      = {SOCIAL COGNITIVE AND AFFECTIVE NEUROSCIENCE},
  keyword      = {ATTENTION,METAANALYSIS,FMRI,PERCEPTION,FACIAL EXPRESSIONS,HUMAN BRAIN,SOCIAL COGNITION,ANTERIOR CINGULATE CORTEX,fMRI,social neuroscience,imitation,mimicry,SELF,RESPONSES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {368--374},
  title        = {Neural correlates of emotional synchrony},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/scan/nsq044},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Kühn, Simone, Barbara CN Müller, Andries van der Leij, Ap Dijksterhuis, Marcel Brass, and Rick B van Baaren. 2011. “Neural Correlates of Emotional Synchrony.” Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience 6 (3): 368–374.
APA
Kühn, S., Müller, B. C., van der Leij, A., Dijksterhuis, A., Brass, M., & van Baaren, R. B. (2011). Neural correlates of emotional synchrony. SOCIAL COGNITIVE AND AFFECTIVE NEUROSCIENCE, 6(3), 368–374.
Vancouver
1.
Kühn S, Müller BC, van der Leij A, Dijksterhuis A, Brass M, van Baaren RB. Neural correlates of emotional synchrony. SOCIAL COGNITIVE AND AFFECTIVE NEUROSCIENCE. 2011;6(3):368–74.
MLA
Kühn, Simone, Barbara CN Müller, Andries van der Leij, et al. “Neural Correlates of Emotional Synchrony.” SOCIAL COGNITIVE AND AFFECTIVE NEUROSCIENCE 6.3 (2011): 368–374. Print.