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The distractor frequency effect in picture–word interference: evidence for response exclusion

Elisah D'Hooge UGent and Robert Hartsuiker UGent (2010) JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION. 36(4). p.878-891
abstract
In 3 experiments, subjects named pictures with low- or high-frequency superimposed distractor words. In a 1st experiment, we replicated the finding that low-frequency words induce more interference in picture naming than high-frequency words (i.e., distractor frequency effect; Miozzo & Caramazza, 2003). According to the response exclusion hypothesis, this effect has its origin at a postlexical stage and is related to a response buffer. The account predicts that the distractor frequency effect should only be present when a response to the word enters the response buffer. This was tested by masking the distractor (Experiment 2) and by presenting it at various time points before stimulus onset (Experiment 3). Results supported the hypothesis by showing that the effect was only present when distractors were visible, and if they were presented in close proximity to the target picture. These results have implications for the models of lexical access and for the tasks that can be used to study this process.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
LEMMA RETRIEVAL, SPEECH PRODUCTION, CONTEXT, LEXICAL ACCESS, LANGUAGE PRODUCTION, COMPETITION, FACILITATION, TASK, SEMANTIC INTERFERENCE, SPREADING-ACTIVATION THEORY
journal title
JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION
J. Exp. Psychol.-Learn. Mem. Cogn.
volume
36
issue
4
pages
878 - 891
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000279023900003
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY, EXPERIMENTAL
JCR impact factor
2.761 (2010)
JCR rank
17/79 (2010)
JCR quartile
1 (2010)
ISSN
0278-7393
DOI
10.1037/a0019128
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1099147
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1099147
date created
2011-01-12 11:22:35
date last changed
2011-01-14 15:53:46
@article{1099147,
  abstract     = {In 3 experiments, subjects named pictures with low- or high-frequency superimposed distractor words. In a 1st experiment, we replicated the finding that low-frequency words induce more interference in picture naming than high-frequency words (i.e., distractor frequency effect; Miozzo \& Caramazza, 2003). According to the response exclusion hypothesis, this effect has its origin at a postlexical stage and is related to a response buffer. The account predicts that the distractor frequency effect should only be present when a response to the word enters the response buffer. This was tested by masking the distractor (Experiment 2) and by presenting it at various time points before stimulus onset (Experiment 3). Results supported the hypothesis by showing that the effect was only present when distractors were visible, and if they were presented in close proximity to the target picture. These results have implications for the models of lexical access and for the tasks that can be used to study this process.},
  author       = {D'Hooge, Elisah and Hartsuiker, Robert},
  issn         = {0278-7393},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION},
  keyword      = {LEMMA RETRIEVAL,SPEECH PRODUCTION,CONTEXT,LEXICAL ACCESS,LANGUAGE PRODUCTION,COMPETITION,FACILITATION,TASK,SEMANTIC INTERFERENCE,SPREADING-ACTIVATION THEORY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {878--891},
  title        = {The distractor frequency effect in picture--word interference: evidence for response exclusion},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0019128},
  volume       = {36},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
D’Hooge, Elisah, and Robert Hartsuiker. 2010. “The Distractor Frequency Effect in Picture–word Interference: Evidence for Response Exclusion.” Journal of Experimental Psychology-learning Memory and Cognition 36 (4): 878–891.
APA
D’Hooge, E., & Hartsuiker, R. (2010). The distractor frequency effect in picture–word interference: evidence for response exclusion. JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION, 36(4), 878–891.
Vancouver
1.
D’Hooge E, Hartsuiker R. The distractor frequency effect in picture–word interference: evidence for response exclusion. JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION. 2010;36(4):878–91.
MLA
D’Hooge, Elisah, and Robert Hartsuiker. “The Distractor Frequency Effect in Picture–word Interference: Evidence for Response Exclusion.” JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION 36.4 (2010): 878–891. Print.