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Listening to yourself is like listening to others: external, but not internal, verbal self-monitoring is based on speech perception

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Abstract
Theories of verbal self-monitoring generally assume an internal (pre-articulatory) monitoring channel, but there is debate about whether this channel relies on speech perception or on production-internal mechanisms. Perception-based theories predict that listening to one's own inner speech has similar behavioural consequences as listening to someone else's speech. Our experiment therefore registered eye-movements while speakers named objects accompanied by phonologically related or unrelated written words. The data showed that listening to one's own speech drives eye-movements to phonologically related words, just as listening to someone else's speech does in perception experiments. The time-course of these eye-movements was very similar to that in other-perception (starting 300 ms post-articulation), which demonstrates that these eye-movements were driven by the perception of overt speech, not inner speech. We conclude that external, but not internal monitoring, is based on speech perception.
Keywords
SPOKEN LANGUAGE, LEXICAL BIAS, VISUAL WORD RECOGNITION, LOOP THEORY, TIME-COURSE, COMPREHENSION, INFORMATION, APHASIA, ERRORS, NORMS

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Chicago
Huettig, Falk, and Robert Hartsuiker. 2010. “Listening to Yourself Is Like Listening to Others: External, but Not Internal, Verbal Self-monitoring Is Based on Speech Perception.” Language and Cognitive Processes 25 (3): 347–374.
APA
Huettig, Falk, & Hartsuiker, R. (2010). Listening to yourself is like listening to others: external, but not internal, verbal self-monitoring is based on speech perception. LANGUAGE AND COGNITIVE PROCESSES, 25(3), 347–374.
Vancouver
1.
Huettig F, Hartsuiker R. Listening to yourself is like listening to others: external, but not internal, verbal self-monitoring is based on speech perception. LANGUAGE AND COGNITIVE PROCESSES. 2010;25(3):347–74.
MLA
Huettig, Falk, and Robert Hartsuiker. “Listening to Yourself Is Like Listening to Others: External, but Not Internal, Verbal Self-monitoring Is Based on Speech Perception.” LANGUAGE AND COGNITIVE PROCESSES 25.3 (2010): 347–374. Print.
@article{1098995,
  abstract     = {Theories of verbal self-monitoring generally assume an internal (pre-articulatory) monitoring channel, but there is debate about whether this channel relies on speech perception or on production-internal mechanisms. Perception-based theories predict that listening to one's own inner speech has similar behavioural consequences as listening to someone else's speech. Our experiment therefore registered eye-movements while speakers named objects accompanied by phonologically related or unrelated written words. The data showed that listening to one's own speech drives eye-movements to phonologically related words, just as listening to someone else's speech does in perception experiments. The time-course of these eye-movements was very similar to that in other-perception (starting 300 ms post-articulation), which demonstrates that these eye-movements were driven by the perception of overt speech, not inner speech. We conclude that external, but not internal monitoring, is based on speech perception.},
  author       = {Huettig, Falk and Hartsuiker, Robert},
  issn         = {0169-0965},
  journal      = {LANGUAGE AND COGNITIVE PROCESSES},
  keyword      = {SPOKEN LANGUAGE,LEXICAL BIAS,VISUAL WORD RECOGNITION,LOOP THEORY,TIME-COURSE,COMPREHENSION,INFORMATION,APHASIA,ERRORS,NORMS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {347--374},
  title        = {Listening to yourself is like listening to others: external, but not internal, verbal self-monitoring is based on speech perception},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01690960903046926},
  volume       = {25},
  year         = {2010},
}

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