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Clinical and imaging tools in the early diagnosis of prostate cancer: a review

Pieter De Visschere UGent, Willem Oosterlinck UGent, Gert De Meerleer UGent and Geert Villeirs UGent (2010) JBR-BTR. 93(2). p.62-70
abstract
Measurement of serum Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) level is useful to detect early prostate cancer. PSA-screening may reduce the mortality rate from prostate cancer, but this is associated with a high rate of overdiagnosis and overtreatment. To improve the detection of clinically significant cancers, several auxiliary clinical and imaging tools can be used. The absolute PSA value can be complemented with parameters such as PSA velocity, PSA density and free/total PSA. Transrectal Ultrasound (TRUS) has only moderate accuracy in the detection of prostate carcinoma, but is very useful in the estimation of prostate volume and thus calculation of PSA-density. The role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in diagnosis and staging of prostate carcinoma is rapidly increasing. Morphologic T2-weighted MR images (T2-WI), preferably with an endorectal coil, depict the prostatic anatomy with high resolution and can detect tumoral areas within the peripheral zone of the prostate. Addition of MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and/or diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) further increase the diagnostic performance of MRI. The gold standard for diagnosis of prostate carcinoma is histological assessment obtained by transrectal ultrasound-guided systematic core needle biopsy. In the future, imaging-based targeted biopsies may improve the biopsy yield and decrease the number of biopsy cores. Computed Tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) have no value in early prostate cancer detection and the indications are limited to lymph node staging and detection of distant metastases.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (review)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
PSA, LOCALIZATION, ULTRASOUND, DIGITAL RECTAL EXAMINATION, RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY, DIFFUSION, TISSUE, ANTIGEN, TRANSITION, MRI
journal title
JBR-BTR
JBR-BTR
volume
93
issue
2
pages
62 - 70
Web of Science type
Review
Web of Science id
000279469800003
JCR category
RADIOLOGY, NUCLEAR MEDICINE & MEDICAL IMAGING
JCR impact factor
0.246 (2010)
JCR rank
108/111 (2010)
JCR quartile
4 (2010)
ISSN
1780-2393
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1097850
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1097850
alternative location
http://www.rbrs.org/dbfiles/journalarticle_0734.pdf
date created
2011-01-11 15:29:07
date last changed
2011-03-31 14:22:14
@article{1097850,
  abstract     = {Measurement of serum Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) level is useful to detect early prostate cancer. PSA-screening may reduce the mortality rate from prostate cancer, but this is associated with a high rate of overdiagnosis and overtreatment. To improve the detection of clinically significant cancers, several auxiliary clinical and imaging tools can be used. The absolute PSA value can be complemented with parameters such as PSA velocity, PSA density and free/total PSA. Transrectal Ultrasound (TRUS) has only moderate accuracy in the detection of prostate carcinoma, but is very useful in the estimation of prostate volume and thus calculation of PSA-density. The role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in diagnosis and staging of prostate carcinoma is rapidly increasing. Morphologic T2-weighted MR images (T2-WI), preferably with an endorectal coil, depict the prostatic anatomy with high resolution and can detect tumoral areas within the peripheral zone of the prostate. Addition of MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and/or diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) further increase the diagnostic performance of MRI. The gold standard for diagnosis of prostate carcinoma is histological assessment obtained by transrectal ultrasound-guided systematic core needle biopsy. In the future, imaging-based targeted biopsies may improve the biopsy yield and decrease the number of biopsy cores. Computed Tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) have no value in early prostate cancer detection and the indications are limited to lymph node staging and detection of distant metastases.},
  author       = {De Visschere, Pieter and Oosterlinck, Willem and De Meerleer, Gert and Villeirs, Geert},
  issn         = {1780-2393},
  journal      = {JBR-BTR},
  keyword      = {PSA,LOCALIZATION,ULTRASOUND,DIGITAL RECTAL EXAMINATION,RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY,DIFFUSION,TISSUE,ANTIGEN,TRANSITION,MRI},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {62--70},
  title        = {Clinical and imaging tools in the early diagnosis of prostate cancer: a review},
  url          = {http://www.rbrs.org/dbfiles/journalarticle\_0734.pdf},
  volume       = {93},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
DE VISSCHERE, PIETER, Willem Oosterlinck, Gert De Meerleer, and Geert Villeirs. 2010. “Clinical and Imaging Tools in the Early Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer: a Review.” Jbr-btr 93 (2): 62–70.
APA
DE VISSCHERE, P., Oosterlinck, W., De Meerleer, G., & Villeirs, G. (2010). Clinical and imaging tools in the early diagnosis of prostate cancer: a review. JBR-BTR, 93(2), 62–70.
Vancouver
1.
DE VISSCHERE P, Oosterlinck W, De Meerleer G, Villeirs G. Clinical and imaging tools in the early diagnosis of prostate cancer: a review. JBR-BTR. 2010;93(2):62–70.
MLA
DE VISSCHERE, PIETER, Willem Oosterlinck, Gert De Meerleer, et al. “Clinical and Imaging Tools in the Early Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer: a Review.” JBR-BTR 93.2 (2010): 62–70. Print.