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The rise of self-determination versus the rise of democracy

Cécile Vandewoude UGent (2010) GOTTINGEN JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL LAW. 2(3). p.981-996
abstract
This article challenges the traditional conception that the right to self-determination does not require a certain outcome. This article examines what restrictions international law imposes on peoples‟ choice to freely determine their political status. This article concludes that the right to self-determination calls for the installment of a form of government which is based on the consent of the governed, is substantially representative of all distinct groups in the country and respects human rights. Regardless of these duties imposed on governments one may only conclude from State practice that it is not observed by many States. As such the rise of self-determination may not automatically be equated to the rise of democracy.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
self-determination, prohibition of racist and segregating regimes, international law, democracy
journal title
GOTTINGEN JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL LAW
Gött. J. Int. Law
volume
2
issue
3
pages
981 - 996
ISSN
1868-1581
DOI
10.3249/1868-1581-2-3-vandewoud
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A2
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
VABB id
c:vabb:301353
VABB type
VABB-1
id
1097583
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1097583
date created
2011-01-11 15:19:20
date last changed
2015-06-17 09:21:27
@article{1097583,
  abstract     = {This article challenges the traditional conception that the right to self-determination does not require a certain outcome. This article examines what restrictions international law imposes on peoples\unmatched{201f} choice to freely determine their political status. This article concludes that the right to self-determination calls for the installment of a form of government which is based on the consent of the governed, is substantially representative of all distinct groups in the country and respects human rights. Regardless of these duties imposed on governments one may only conclude from State practice that it is not observed by many States. As such the rise of self-determination may not automatically be equated to the rise of democracy.},
  author       = {Vandewoude, C{\'e}cile},
  issn         = {1868-1581},
  journal      = {GOTTINGEN JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL LAW},
  keyword      = {self-determination,prohibition of racist and segregating regimes,international law,democracy},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {981--996},
  title        = {The rise of self-determination versus the rise of democracy},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3249/1868-1581-2-3-vandewoud},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Vandewoude, Cécile. 2010. “The Rise of Self-determination Versus the Rise of Democracy.” Gottingen Journal of International Law 2 (3): 981–996.
APA
Vandewoude, C. (2010). The rise of self-determination versus the rise of democracy. GOTTINGEN JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL LAW, 2(3), 981–996.
Vancouver
1.
Vandewoude C. The rise of self-determination versus the rise of democracy. GOTTINGEN JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL LAW. 2010;2(3):981–96.
MLA
Vandewoude, Cécile. “The Rise of Self-determination Versus the Rise of Democracy.” GOTTINGEN JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL LAW 2.3 (2010): 981–996. Print.