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An upland farming system under transformation: proximate causes of land use change in Bela-Welleh catchment (Wag, Northern Ethiopian Highlands)

Getachew Simegn, Jan Nyssen UGent and Nurehussien Taha (2010) GLP Open Science Meeting, Abstracts. p.21-21
abstract
A possible way out of the ‘low-level equilibrium trap' in the Ethiopian Highlands is agricultural intensification. To characterise and quantify current transformations in these permanent upland cultivation systems, a detailed study on land use changes and its proximate causes was carried out in the 41 km2 Bela-Welleh catchment (2050-3682 m a.s.l.) in the Wag zone of Amhara Region, Northern Ethiopia. Land use maps were obtained through aerial photo interpretation (1965 and 1986) and detailed field mapping (2005-2006). Interpretation of topographic maps and field mapping gave knowledge of the spatial distribution of possible explanatory factors. Major land use changes are (1) a gradual abandonment of mountain agriculture which was replaced by woody vegetation (now covering 70% of the upper catchment) and (2) the widespread introduction of irrigation agriculture, wherever water is available (from 0% in 1982 to 5% of the catchment in 2006). Whereas both changes are favoured by government policies, they have now at least partially been taken up by the farming communities. The study demonstrates these land use changes and their influencing factors. Changes of crop- and rangeland into forest occur on the steeper slopes in higher topographical position. Changes from rain fed cropland into irrigated cropland (two harvests) depend obviously on the availability of water, but also on population density, and inversely on distance to Sekota town. We are here in presence of an almost classical example of the mutation of a ‘‘permanent upland cultivation system'' into a system with irrigated agriculture.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
published
subject
in
GLP Open Science Meeting, Abstracts
pages
21 - 21
publisher
Global Land Project (GLP)
conference name
GLP Open Science Meeting 2010 : Land systems, global change and sustainability
conference location
Tempe, AZ, USA
conference start
2010-10-17
conference end
2010-10-19
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
C3
id
1097361
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1097361
date created
2011-01-11 14:30:29
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:34:54
@inproceedings{1097361,
  abstract     = {A possible way out of the {\textquoteleft}low-level equilibrium trap' in the Ethiopian Highlands is agricultural intensification. To characterise and quantify current transformations in these permanent upland cultivation systems, a detailed study on land use changes and its proximate causes was carried out in the 41 km2 Bela-Welleh catchment (2050-3682 m a.s.l.) in the Wag zone of Amhara Region, Northern Ethiopia. Land use maps were obtained through aerial photo interpretation (1965 and 1986) and detailed field mapping (2005-2006). Interpretation of topographic maps and field mapping gave knowledge of the spatial distribution of possible explanatory factors. Major land use changes are (1) a gradual abandonment of mountain agriculture which was replaced by woody vegetation (now covering 70\% of the upper catchment) and (2) the widespread introduction of irrigation agriculture, wherever water is available (from 0\% in 1982 to 5\% of the catchment in 2006). Whereas both changes are favoured by government policies, they have now at least partially been taken up by the farming communities. The study demonstrates these land use changes and their influencing factors. Changes of crop- and rangeland into forest occur on the steeper slopes in higher topographical position. Changes from rain fed cropland into irrigated cropland (two harvests) depend obviously on the availability of water, but also on population density, and inversely on distance to Sekota town. We are here in presence of an almost classical example of the mutation of a {\textquoteleft}{\textquoteleft}permanent upland cultivation system'' into a system with irrigated agriculture.},
  author       = {Simegn, Getachew  and Nyssen, Jan and Taha, Nurehussien},
  booktitle    = {GLP Open Science Meeting, Abstracts},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Tempe, AZ, USA},
  pages        = {21--21},
  publisher    = {Global Land Project (GLP)},
  title        = {An upland farming system under transformation: proximate causes of land use change in Bela-Welleh catchment (Wag, Northern Ethiopian Highlands)},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Simegn, Getachew , Jan Nyssen, and Nurehussien Taha. 2010. “An Upland Farming System Under Transformation: Proximate Causes of Land Use Change in Bela-Welleh Catchment (Wag, Northern Ethiopian Highlands).” In GLP Open Science Meeting, Abstracts, 21–21. Global Land Project (GLP).
APA
Simegn, G., Nyssen, J., & Taha, N. (2010). An upland farming system under transformation: proximate causes of land use change in Bela-Welleh catchment (Wag, Northern Ethiopian Highlands). GLP Open Science Meeting, Abstracts (pp. 21–21). Presented at the GLP Open Science Meeting 2010 : Land systems, global change and sustainability, Global Land Project (GLP).
Vancouver
1.
Simegn G, Nyssen J, Taha N. An upland farming system under transformation: proximate causes of land use change in Bela-Welleh catchment (Wag, Northern Ethiopian Highlands). GLP Open Science Meeting, Abstracts. Global Land Project (GLP); 2010. p. 21–21.
MLA
Simegn, Getachew , Jan Nyssen, and Nurehussien Taha. “An Upland Farming System Under Transformation: Proximate Causes of Land Use Change in Bela-Welleh Catchment (Wag, Northern Ethiopian Highlands).” GLP Open Science Meeting, Abstracts. Global Land Project (GLP), 2010. 21–21. Print.