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Persisting activation in voluntary task switching: it all depends on the instructions

Baptist Liefooghe UGent, Jelle Demanet UGent and André Vandierendonck UGent (2010) PSYCHONOMIC BULLETIN & REVIEW. 17(3). p.381-386
abstract
We tested the hypothesis that persisting activation from a previous task execution does not contribute to the switch cost in voluntary task switching. We reasoned that voluntary task switching requires the selection of random task sequences, which necessitates the active inhibition of previously executed tasks. The asymmetric switch cost was used as a marker for persisting activation. Participants switched voluntarily between color naming and word naming. One group was instructed to select unpredictable task sequences. The other group was not instructed to do so. When participants were instructed to be unpredictable, no asymmetric switch cost was observed. When participants were not instructed to be unpredictable, an asymmetric switch cost was observed. We conclude that the amount of persisting activation in voluntary task switching is limited and that the switch cost in voluntary task switching reflects the time needed for reconfiguring the cognitive system from one task to another rather than the time needed to compensate for persisting activation.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
EXECUTIVE CONTROL, MEMORY, SET SELECTION, COSTS
journal title
PSYCHONOMIC BULLETIN & REVIEW
Psychon. Bull. Rev.
volume
17
issue
3
pages
381 - 386
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000281812700014
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY, MATHEMATICAL
JCR impact factor
2.283 (2010)
JCR rank
2/11 (2010)
JCR quartile
1 (2010)
ISSN
1069-9384
DOI
10.3758/PBR.17.3.381
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1096370
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1096370
date created
2011-01-10 13:04:01
date last changed
2011-01-14 11:17:41
@article{1096370,
  abstract     = {We tested the hypothesis that persisting activation from a previous task execution does not contribute to the switch cost in voluntary task switching. We reasoned that voluntary task switching requires the selection of random task sequences, which necessitates the active inhibition of previously executed tasks. The asymmetric switch cost was used as a marker for persisting activation. Participants switched voluntarily between color naming and word naming. One group was instructed to select unpredictable task sequences. The other group was not instructed to do so. When participants were instructed to be unpredictable, no asymmetric switch cost was observed. When participants were not instructed to be unpredictable, an asymmetric switch cost was observed. We conclude that the amount of persisting activation in voluntary task switching is limited and that the switch cost in voluntary task switching reflects the time needed for reconfiguring the cognitive system from one task to another rather than the time needed to compensate for persisting activation.},
  author       = {Liefooghe, Baptist and Demanet, Jelle and Vandierendonck, Andr{\'e}},
  issn         = {1069-9384},
  journal      = {PSYCHONOMIC BULLETIN \& REVIEW},
  keyword      = {EXECUTIVE CONTROL,MEMORY,SET SELECTION,COSTS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {381--386},
  title        = {Persisting activation in voluntary task switching: it all depends on the instructions},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/PBR.17.3.381},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Liefooghe, Baptist, Jelle Demanet, and André Vandierendonck. 2010. “Persisting Activation in Voluntary Task Switching: It All Depends on the Instructions.” Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 17 (3): 381–386.
APA
Liefooghe, B., Demanet, J., & Vandierendonck, A. (2010). Persisting activation in voluntary task switching: it all depends on the instructions. PSYCHONOMIC BULLETIN & REVIEW, 17(3), 381–386.
Vancouver
1.
Liefooghe B, Demanet J, Vandierendonck A. Persisting activation in voluntary task switching: it all depends on the instructions. PSYCHONOMIC BULLETIN & REVIEW. 2010;17(3):381–6.
MLA
Liefooghe, Baptist, Jelle Demanet, and André Vandierendonck. “Persisting Activation in Voluntary Task Switching: It All Depends on the Instructions.” PSYCHONOMIC BULLETIN & REVIEW 17.3 (2010): 381–386. Print.